Importance Of Nationalism In Vietnam

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The strategic implementation of nationalism in Vietnam was heavily effectuated in order to attain independence from French colonialism and imperialism. Utilising nationalism, the encompassment of uniting the spirit and aspirations of those that are communal to the whole nation; Ho Chi Minh is the most prominent and successful figure in creating a sense of national identity for the Vietnamese. From the duration of 1945 to 1954, the landscape of Vietnam under French imperialism were detrimental to the Vietnamese however, it was these long and short term consequences that highlighted the importance of nationalism in the struggle of Vietnamese independence.
Vietnamese independence were subjected under French colonial domination since 1887 and
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Ho Chi Minh’s declaration of Independence on the 2nd of September 1945, after the reconquering of Saigon and Cochin-china on 25th August 1945 had reinforced, strengthened and maintained Vietnamese nationalism. This is further shown through the excitement of rallying people behind the slogan “Vietnam for the Vietnamese”. This perspective from the Vietnamese emphasises the trust and agreement with Ho Chi Minh’s nationalistic viewpoint and gives prominence to Ho’s statement- “Nationhood… is greater than any weapons in the world”- which further accentuates the importance of nationalism in the battle of Vietnamese independence. Nonetheless, the French refused to accept this Declaration of Independence and thus began the First Indochinese War. As the United States feared Eisenhower’s (US President) domino effect, the view of one country ‘falling’ to communism would cause the systematic result of other countries ‘falling’ simultaneously, eventually the French gained the support of the US government. The Indochinese War continued for over seven years and with the Viet Minh successful guerrilla attacks, they reseized control of the Red River Delta, countryside and the north this in which highlights the nationalistic motivation in the struggle of gaining Vietnamese independence. However, with the success of nationalism in the Viet Minh, for one death of a French soldier cost the lives of ten Vietnamese which emphasises the importance of nationalism to the battle of Vietnamese independence. From the viewpoint of the French and the United States, Ho Chi Minh was a devil glorifying communism under the false pretence of equality. This however, was bias as both these countries were capitalistic nations that thrive capitalism, an economic system that pursuits opportunities for an individual’s profit. Nevertheless,

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