Comparison To The Movie In John Steinbeck's Of Mice And Men

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When one loves a book that has been made into a movie, it may not live up to the readers ' expectations. Of Mice and Men, a 1937 novel written by John Steinbeck, is one of America 's greatest works of literature. This work was made into a major motion picture when Gary Sinise directed the 1992 MGM film adaptation. Both works of art tell the story of immigrant farmers- George Milton and Lennie Small- who face many challenges to one day hope to acquire their shared dream of settling down on their own piece of land. Many books are turned into films, where different people determine which they prefer. In some cases, some people find the film better than the book. Viewers would say that the film better conveys the Steinbeck 's intent. Undoubtedly, …show more content…
Readers believe that the film is lacking the character development that Steinbeck used. They believe the novel gives them a better understanding of the characters as opposed to the film. For instance, Curley 's wife was often portrayed as a sneaky, lonely woman whom may have cheated on Curley and did not have the respect of the other ranchers. In fact, her morality lowered during the scene where she yelled at Crooks using harsh, racial words. The rumors about her character when she threatened, "Listen, Nigger...You know what I can do to you if you open your trap?....I could get you strung up on a tree so easy it ain 't even funny"(Steinbeck, 80-81) proved to be true. IN spite of this, readers know that Curley 's wife acted through the loneliness she has been subjected to when she married Curley. Thus, when she was in barn with Lennie and George, she was not speaking out of spite, but instead to find someone to talk to. Likewise, Steinbeck further developed Curley 's wife through her death. Near the end of the book, Lennie and Curley 's wife were conversing when she gave permission to touch her hair. Due to the fact that Lennie would not let go when she told him to, he grabbed hold of her hair and snapped her neck. Following her death, Curley 's wife faced redemption, as "the meanness and the planning and the discontent and the ache for attention were all gone from her face"(Steinbeck, 92). …show more content…
Viewers would proclaim the film better because of its more realistic characterization. For instance, Slim "a tall man...moved with a majesty only achieved by royalty and master craftsmen....There was a gravity in his manner and a quiet so profound that all talk stopped when he spoke. His authority was so great that his word was taken on any subject..."(Steinbeck, 33). Steinbeck portrayed Slim as God. Steinbeck spent an entire page describing Slim 's physique and indicated that Slim is unique. Slim was someone whom receives respect from others and is the "prince of the ranch". He gets attention when he walks into the room, and all talk stops. His word is as good as the law, and is always followed as evident from Steinbeck 's description. However, the Sinise portrayed Slim as a regular rancher, not God. As Lennie and George were cleaning up to get ready to eat lunch, Slim was introduced. Once Slim was introduced the scene, the ranchers all continued to eat as if nothing has happened (Sinise). The film portrayed Slim as a regular rancher. He did not get the attention of the other ranchers, but instead simply sat down, and life continued on. Throughout the film, not once was Slim portrayed any more than a typical rancher. The film characterization of Slim was more realistic then the novel. He was not portrayed as a God, but more humane. His

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