The Communist Manifesto Book Report

Decent Essays
During the nineteenth century, many tensions were occurring within the European nations. Individuals were split into groups that were against each other which cause the creation of communism to begin during the nineteenth century. Before communism became fully accepted, the Communist Manifesto is put forth to the European nation by Karl Marx and Frederick Engels. However, this pamphlet was not fully integrated, but it did bring forth more believers. The Communist Manifesto is linked to the nineteenth century because of the class struggles, private property, and labor during the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. Over many centuries, classes has always been the classifier for status within a nation. Status has been reshape and remodify to fit the demands of the upper class that defines the social structure of nations. According to Karl Marx and Frederick Engels, the new structure of bourgeois society has sprouted from the ruins of the previous society however, …show more content…
The pamphlet explains the problems with the society of the bourgeoisies as they are no different from the proletariat as they rise from the previous social structure. The Communist Manifesto was linked to the nineteenth century as there were a new social structure and a new group that has created the structure after the fallen social ladder. The Communist Manifesto found common ground during the nineteenth century is due to the movement of the Industrial Revolution. As the Industrial Revolution moves into the European countries much of the demand for workers has changed displaying the injustice in labor, class, and property. The Communist Manifesto was a creation of new ideas challenging the old ways of the nation as the century moves into a new dawn of a

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