Comparing Reid Interview Technique And The PEACE Model

Improved Essays
Comparing Reid Interview Technique and the PEACE Model

Dominic Wood

Police Foundations

Interview and investigations

Amy Bjerkens

October 03 2017

Comparing Reid Interviewing technique and the PEACE model
While the Reid model aims at obtaining a confession from the witness or suspect, the PEACE Model aims at getting the information that will help in determining the guiltiness or the innocence of the subject.
Whereas the Reid model is interrogator-based and follows what is dictated by nature and the reactions of the subject, the PEACE Model is a step by step process which is preplanned in the mind of the interrogator.
The Reid interviewing model is based on body language while the PEACE Model is founded on deceiving the subject
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However, the PEACE model requires planning and preparation as a crucial step in interviewing a criminal. The interrogator must know what they are after before going into the room of the suspect or a witness. Interrogators must also know whether or not the time they have will allow them to achieve what they have planned. It involves planning and having a cognitive strategy or procedure to apply during an interrogation.
Both the Reid and the PEACE Model involve showing some degree of concern to the subject to make them feel comfortable talking to you and reduce their guilt.
While Reid technique requires retaining the attention of a suspect through the proximate distance between interrogators and the suspect or use of hypothetical questions, the PEACE Model involves persuasion to seek for corporation between the interviewers and the suspect or witness which assists in access to information that is relevant and crucial in developing or collapsing a
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These details act as major testing ground for basing the proof of the suspect’s guilt. The interrogator is not very concerned with the relationship between them and the subjects. However, the PEACE MODEL necessitates engaging the witness or suspect and giving them a clue of what is expected of them and the need for compliance. This ensures that an understanding or a bond is established between the interviewer and the interviewee to make them feel comfortable giving you the information you need from

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