Case Study On Emergency Management

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EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT BASED CASE STUDY ON A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

CONTENTS
I. Introduction
II. Problem Statement:
III. Literature Review
IV. Conclusion

Introduction
Previous papers propose that emergencies are accidents and therefore are unforeseen. While the term emergency implies a condition of urgency and need, and thus implies lack of preparation and need for response, this view is not accurate. While the incidence of accidents leads to crises, it is not possible to use historical information to predict accidents and therefore make future preparations. The increase is an attribute if climate change and the increased severity of the accidents is a result of increased populations in the world. Therefore, these are emerging issues,
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They suggest that these disasters have the largest impact on the hotel industry and thus affect tourism in a direct manner. However, they recommend that the same issues have affected the whole industry in the past, and evaluating the past to make comparisons and therefore draw conclusions about the future. However, Chung-Hung Tsaia and Cheng-Wu Chen proposes that these methods have not been productive because the hotel industry is still affected by high incidence of accidents (Tsaia, & Chen 2013). Therefore, Chung-Hung Tsaia and Cheng-Wu Chen suggest this method is no longer effective in dealing with disasters. They show that the frequency of natural disasters such as earthquakes cannot be classified as accidents, they are simply functions of the natural environment and preparedness is not a solution. For example, preparation has not been able to reduce the rates of fatality because of increasing populations and rising severity of the accidents. instead, strategic planning and prediction of future trends, such as new tourism prevalence that cannot be accounted for by past events, is the best way forward for the tourism industry in the country (Tsaia, & Chen …show more content…
Hughey suggest that in most places, past events are used to predict the future, much like the first paper proposed. For example, in emergency preparedness, past events are used to identify discontinuities in the current trends and therefore play a role in directing planning and preparation activities (Beckena & Hughey, 2013). In addition, emergency response is derived from experiences. However, they also propose that in the tourism industry, the distinction is not clear (Beckena & Hughey, 2013). For example, the emergence of new preferences makes it impossible to use past trends to predict the future. For example, the report identifies the absence of research as a major of the major problems in emergency management (Beckena & Hughey, 2013). It concludes that increasing the volume of research is a better tool of management than using past trends because research considers all factors. Form this paper; the deduction that risk management is dependent on past trends is disputed. Instead, an approach that considers both the past and the present as a means of predicting the future is preferred. However, the report also concedes that it is not possible to predict the future based on the current trends because tourism is dependent on a variety of factors such as economic preferences. For example, the rise of Dubai as a prime destination for the upper social classes was not

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