Religious War Summary

Decent Essays
CH 12 Age of religious wars Matthew Bauchert
RENEWED RELIGIOUS STRUGGLE PG 390 -392
• Peace of Augsburg – legal Lutheranism in HRE but not Calvinists and Anabaptists
• After council of Trent-Jesuits launch global counter-offensive against Protestantism
• Intellectuals preach tolerance before politicians
• Castellio comments of killing of Servetus by calvin
• Politiques- rulers who urged tolerance, moderation, and compromise
• Catholics and Protestants struggle for control of France, Netherlands and England

FRENCH WARS OF RELIGION (1562-1598) PG 392-397
• French protestants= Huguenots- from Besancon Hugues- leader of Geneva’s political revolt against House of Savoy 1520’s
• HRE emperor Charles V captured Fancis I of France at Battle of Pavia ion 1525-
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• Catherine de Medicis- regent after Francis II died for Charles IX- Younger son
• Tried to reconcile protestant and catholic factions
• 1562 January edict- granted protestants freedom to worship publicly outside towns and privately in them
• March 1562 toleration ended when duke of guise massacred worshipers at vassy in champagne
• Crown supported catholic side of conflict
• Peace of saint- Germain-en-laye-durning 1st French war of religion ( April 1562-March 1563)
• Ended 3rd phase of war where power of protestant nobility acknowledged and Huguenots granted religious freedoms within territories and right to fortify cities
• Saint bartholomew’s day massacre- August 24, 1572 coligny and 3,000 huguenots butchered In paris- Three days estimated 20,000 killed
• Henry III Last of Henry II’s sons to rule France- Attempted to institute moderated religious reforms
• Received support from Neutral Catholics and Huguenots
• Peace of Beauliea- May 1576- granted Huguenots almost complete religious and civil freedom
• After 7 months catholic league forced Henry to attempt imposing religious unity in France
• Day of the Barricades- Henry tried to rout catholic league with surprise attack 1588- failed- forced to leave

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