Plumb's Analysis

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British attitudes towards America prior to the revolution (approximately 1760s) was ultimately sympathetic and supportive. Plumb begins by expressing how in Britain, “For nearly two decades every…Whig ministry rapidly followed another” (Plumb 71). He goes on describing the notions and criticisms of Lord North’s American policy, “Not until rebellion flared up…American policy had become widespread” (Plumb 71). He explores the attitudes in England further by mentioning, a “band of radicals” that formed who: “believed in a wider democratic franchise, toleration of religious belief and the rationalization of law and administration. They were irritated by anachronism” (Plumb 72).
Amongst the most powerful of radicals were the intellectuals and publicists—Joseph
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In closing out the article, Plumb states “Of course traditional institutions were…saddled with its feudal past” (Plumb 87). Here, we see how revolution was fundamentally important. It was the major force behind pushing both America and Britain towards the future developments of their nations. The relationship between an industrial revolution and a political one in Britain and America is an almost overlapping/cause-and-effect relationships. He begins my stating how “Some…well-known (British) radicals…whose lavish patronage of liberal ideas helped to keep republican sentiment alive in the middle decades of the eighteenth century” (Plumb 73). Plumb continues by explaining the industrial relationship at hand “Of course, it is not…ally for the American cause” (Plumb 77-78) which, explored further, “was only partially due to…hands of the landowning classes” (Plumb 78). He explains how the political relationship affected trade, “The policy of successive ministries…turned itself into a European war” (Plumb

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