Brief Summary And Arrangement In Truman Capote's In Cold Blood

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Brief Summary and “Arrangement” of Book
Capote’s In Cold Blood is a nonfiction book chronicling the murder and investigation behind the 1959 Clutter homicide. On the very first page there is a short page on Truman Capote, and his achievements. The book itself is divided into four parts: the Last to See Them Alive, Persons Unknown, The Answer, and the Corner. These are then divided into untitled chapters. The point-of-view switches between various characters such as Mr. Clutter, Nancy, Perry, Dick, Detective Dewey, etc.
The Last to See Them Alive
The story begins in the sleepy town of Holcomb, Kansas, where Herbert Clutter wakes up on the last day of his life. Nancy (his daughter) gets a call from her friend Susan, and discusses her father’s
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The Clutters are a wholesome, ordinary American family. Many readers can compare themselves to this relatable family unit. Then there is Dick. He is a loathsome character; Capote makes sure that it is difficult to sympathize with him. He is put there to remind the reader the duo committed a crime. Perry—his partner –is a somewhat gentle, sweet character. It is evident that the author pays particular attention to him, even giving him his own special chapter. Then there’s Dewey, the detective. He represents the community, justice, and even Capote himself (since he dug into the case himself, going as far as to travel to …show more content…
I constantly forgot it isn’t fiction. I realized while reading it that if such a tragedy can happen to a normal, sweet family like the Clutters, it can happen to anyone. The victim and the perpetrator don’t even have to be connected somehow. That was always apparent, but this story drove that home. The book is great at making a story out of a horrific event. However, I feel that Dick’s character was not built as much as Perry’s. He felt lacking and not memorable. Mostly what I remember is he’s a violent, creepy pervert. On the other hand, I know a great deal about Perry. I don’t think you should keep it on the list, or else some poor student next year will pick it and then have to reread it in class. Remember to remove

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