Braithwaite's Sub-Theory Of Reintegrative Shaming Theory

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4. Expanding the Labeling Theory beyond primary and secondary deviance, Braithwaite’s sub-theory of Reintegrative Shaming sought to provide a better understanding and new approach to understanding the role of labeling criminal activity throughout society. According to Reid (2012), Braithwaite’s restorative justice theorized that “labeling might cause some people to abandon criminal activity; it might cause others to continue crime” (p. 173). The major difference between reintegrative shaming theory and traditional labeling theory is the rejection of the idea “that stigmatization is an inevitable product of social disapproval, and its corollary that the application of social control is a fraught exercise” (Harris, 2010, p. 4). Braithwaite …show more content…
According to Lilly, Cullen, and Ball (2015), labeling theorists sought a reduction in crime if labeling theory was implemented in decriminalization, diversion, due process, and deinstitutionalization programs and processes (p. 163). However, it is evident many polices can be implemented insight of the labeling theory. For example, utilizing other forms of jailing for juveniles. Not every juvenile that is caught with a pack of cigarettes deserves to spend time in a juvenile detention center. If that were the case, then the label that society has placed on the juveniles that have committed a harmless crime will fall under a stereotype and not seek reintegration but the urge to commit more crimes, over time. If the labeling theory is applied to today’s criminal justice system then utilizing the thousands of programs that are involved with reintegration and reducing the label that the offender has attained can greatly reduce overall crime rates. Instead of placing all offenders in prison or detention centers, it would greatly reduce the label if other programs were implemented first rather than later. Additionally, labeling theory focuses on primary and secondary deviance. Being able to implement social control before the individual commits a deviant act can be achieved through education and the presence of social bonds. Making the individuals aware of the negative consequences of committing a crime and the labels that could possible follow. The reduction of crime with the focus on primary deviance relates back to other theories, however, the reduction of crime and the stereotypes that follows secondary deviance relies heavily on how primary deviance is handled and perceived. If programs are implemented in cutting off labels through reintegration and placing an emphasis on punishment through individual growth

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