Correctional Ideology

1878 Words 8 Pages
“The correctional ideology refers to a body of ideas and practices that pertain to the processing of offenders, as determined by law.” There are three main correctional ideologies: punishment, rehabilitation, and prevention. Throughout history, these have been the methods used to deal with offenders. The make-up of these ideologies connects to the public’s opinion of the criminals. Whether society has chosen an “eye for an eye,” a more humane standard, or a hope to prevent crime, these ideologies have no doubt changed throughout time to accommodate the public’s needs. The question then lies, what do these ideologies consist of? These ideologies have various subcategories, and the focus here is to go in depth to better understand punishment, …show more content…
There are three reasons that society would use to justify a punishment ideology. The first and most common purpose is retribution. Retribution is about society and the victim getting even with the criminal. “The fundamental principle underlying the justice model is that society has a duty to punish those who break its laws and that this threat of punishment is vital in implementing the law” (Wrobleski 557). Society reasons that the answer for people that break the law is to simply get even with them. The idea being that the punishment should be equivalent to the crime. “Proponents advocate just deserts, which defines justice in terms of fairness and proportionality” (Houghton) There are some issues with retribution. This component consists of punishing the perpetrator only because they feel the need to get revenge. This could be deemed unconstitutional because it could be viewed as cruel and unusual …show more content…
The previously discussed ideologies had several problems with the effects that they caused. The current correctional practices have problems that have caused the desire for crime prevention to become prevalent. “Almost all offenders are eventually released, however, and the problem returns unless it has been effectively treated while the offender was in prison” (Allen 57). The logic behind crime prevention is clear. Preventing crime is to prevent everything that follows the crime as well. However, crime is impossible to totally prevent in society. “Crime in some form is an inevitable accompaniment in society and if serious crime were prevented, authorities would focus their attention om minor offenses” (Allen 57). This correlates to major crimes. If they were prevented, smaller crimes would become highly punishable, which would likely cause rates of

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