Picturebook Analysis

Better Essays
Picturebook Analysis

The book’s title is “a combination of a name and an epithet or appellation” (Nikolajeva & Scott, 2006, p.242). The reader can expect that the protagonist is a boy. “Incredible” and “book eating” further reveal the theme of the story; the word “incredible” implies an evaluation of the main character, which may disclose the opinion and focus of the narrator. The cover also foreshadows what the story may be about. Each word is represented in different fonts and sizes on the cover (2007 edition): “incredible” forms an arch in eye-catching red; “book”, which is a collage of pages from books and notebooks, seems to be slightly bigger than the other words; “boy” is painted in warm orange tones identical to Henry’s hoodie and
…show more content…
He ascertains that “Sometimes the pictures can inform the words rather than the other way around. Often it’s easier for me to not say something in words. I show it rather than say it” (cited in Sainsbury & Styles, 2012, p.100). Entering the book, the reader may immediately become aware of his sensitivity to word-image interplay. It is hard to neglect the warmth and the organic feel of the book with its predominantly beige or brown backgrounds and his sketches which are in pastel tones of orange, red and brown. Jeffers contrasts a variety of rough textures with the flat digital colours of the shadows of characters, which distinguish them from the backgrounds. His drawing is relatively simple; Henry is a round-headed boy with stick legs drawn in a quick cartoon style. However, the illustrations of Henry are still effective in showing Henry’s emotions. His mouth is “the most salient trait” that shows what he might be thinking either by disappearing or having upturned and downturned corners (Nikolajeva, 2013, p.251). The expression of his eyebrows reveals his puzzlement and uneasiness when he starts to get information mixed up. The tones and emotions of the book are also represented by framing; unlike the majority of the spreads, the double spreads (figures 1 & 2) where Henry is told to stop eating books are clearly framed, and the verbal texts are also presented in the frame. …show more content…
To begin the story, the narrator uses “direct address to the reader”: the narrator exposes itself and refers to itself as “I”, which reveals the story as a construction (Nikolajeva & Scott, 2006, p.221). Later, when Henry gives up eating books and becomes upset, the narrator asks the direct question to the reader: “What was he to do?”. This creates intimacy between the narrator and the reader and draws the reader in more. One of the most significant devices is Jeffers’ “pastiche of illustrative styles” (Anstey, 2009, p.34). Collage is evident in places as Jeffers draws on a wide range of recycled background materials, including covers, spines, and endpapers from books; lined paper, squared paper and graph paper in notebooks; index cards and pages from dictionaries, atlases; and even maths books. Through the technique of collage, these materials not only “draw attention to themselves for what they are”, but also require the reader to “see them as part of the composition” (Doonan, 1993, p.82). Many of them are tattered, yellowed, torn, or flyblown. Placing them within the story, Jeffers creates subtle connections and composes new meanings. He turns the cover of an encyclopaedia into a theatre stage, and the school blackboard comes from the cover of a book published by “Board of Education”. A page from a dictionary becomes wallpaper (figure 4) and humorously contains the words “intellectuality”, “intelligence”, and

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Art Critique

    • 1258 Words
    • 6 Pages

    His choice of colors are still colors bring out a romantic mood and peaceful mood. The colors he includes in the painting are still not vibrant and flashy yet he still finds a way to make the blue and green undertones stand out in a way that is eye-catching. The fact that he was not so obvious with using a red color scheme for this painting make it much more significant because in a way he is redefining the blue and green color he chose to use by allowing them to be subtler and simple versus loud and…

    • 1258 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In conclusion, Details are just as important as the other two factors of mood. Weather it is a lack of details, or details that are otherwise unnecessary they can create the mood. So when reading, pay attention to the small things and you will understand the book much better. All of these facts and quotes lead to one main idea. that the overall mood of the book, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Ominous Mystery, set by the Imagery, diction, and details.…

    • 584 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Fiction is fiction. To call a story a true story is an insult to both art and truth” (Nabokov 12). Nabokov intentionally writes simple his sentences is to get the readers to remember these sentences. They are straight to the point, the sentences are very short, and they are clear and emphasize the message. There is also parallelism which helps balance and give a smoother feel when reading this.…

    • 1259 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Both Art Spiegelman and Anthony Doerr have unique writing styles which are evident throughout each novel. Art Spiegelman, the author of Maus: A Survivor's Tale, has a rather conversational writing style. The plot follows Vladek's less than perfect English dialect while he tells his Holocaust experience to his son, Art. Anthony Doerr, the author of All the Light We Cannot See, possesses more of a narrative style, considering the point of view is third person omniscient. The story is told by analyzing the major characters thoughts and feelings.…

    • 543 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This paired with the Seanchaí style of storytelling – such as in the opening, “Hello there boys and girl and I hope you are well. The story I have for you this morning...” – allows the novel to be read like it would be told in the oral tradition. The narration maintains this tone but gets increasingly more cynical throughout. It is curious how McCabe writes about such tragic material, suicide, adultery, psychosis, but in such upbeat or light-hearted fashion. McCabe’s ironic style of writing is actually what makes it easier to read.…

    • 1872 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Tragedy of War All 108 pages of William Golding’s Lord of the Flies has a bounty of symbols. Some as large as the allegory of the entire book, and some as small as the glasses on someone’s face. Though many of the symbols are similar and blend together, each one in Lord of the Flies serves its own unique purpose. Together, all of the symbols work to make an allegorical novel that set a precedence in English classrooms for times to come. Each symbol in Lord of the Flies varies in meaning and power.…

    • 1224 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Fortunately, Dickens uses common literary devices, that when analyzed, will make the message of the passage easier to understand. Readers may not know much about the London landmarks that Dickens talks about in this book, but the readers may be familiar with the bible and its passages, and analyzing Charles Dickens´ allusions should make the message easier to conclude. Just because this book is old, and written by a well known author doe not mean that the diction and style used will be difficult to understand. Besides creating allusions in Great Expectations, Charles Dickens also takes a somewhat comedic approach I parts of the book an created hyperboles and the word choice used to create these hyperboles aren´t so prosperous that it would be unclear. Some examples of the authorś use of hyperboles are, ¨Mrs.…

    • 1038 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In this stanza the lines would be even mimicking the shelves upon shelves of books of every color, creed and subject. This stanza would describe in detail the physical fascination and intimidation one should have with this place. Stanza two would describe the inhabitants of the Central Library. It focus on the fools who instead of drinking from the fountain of knowledge (aka book), shoot a crude version of intelligence into their veins in short bile biased bites. (This would be a slight exaggeration of Buzzfeed, Fox, and other angled newsfeeds that obsessed with what is happening now.)…

    • 1202 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Note Taking Techniques

    • 901 Words
    • 4 Pages

    They are also convenient to have to take little impromptu notes. You can just save them and add them to your original note paper. I 'm not too fond of using technology to take notes. I enjoy pen…

    • 901 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    It takes usage and familiarity of illustrations and words for a person to feel content with just one form of expression. Evidently. he values and pays homage to both styles of storytelling and message relay as they can effectively describe a main point. In all, McCloud finds fascination in how well words and images can convey full and complete ideas. He also understands that words can be better prefered over pictures, because some people are visually illiterate, but illustrations are just as essential vocabulary building learning blocks because they too can stand…

    • 1206 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays