Plague Breakout

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Most people have heard of the devastating dark ages event, the Black Death. This breakout caused the largest biochemical disaster known to mankind. The bacteria that caused the black plague is known as Yersinia pestis, and continues to exist even today. At the time when the original plague broke out, lack of medicine, and other sanitary needs greatly affected how quickly the plague was able to spread. Although the overall period of time is mostly considered to be the breakout of one common disease, it was actually three different types of infections from the same bacteria. This specific plague breakout, overall, was characterized as one of the darkest times in history and had innumerable effects on the world. It began in the early 1330s. …show more content…
Although all forms of plague are very fatal, the first form was the least deadliest of the three. This form is the Bubonic Plague. It was spread by fleas that carried the disease from rats. When one contracts this disease they usually start with flu-like symptoms and a fever. Following this buboes, which are “...black welts and bulges” form in lymph node areas(Cantor 12). These black marks are what lead to this outbreak being termed, “The Black Death”. In normal situations, the lymph nodes would fight against foreign bacteria to keep the body healthy. Unfortunately, by the time the bacteria reaches the lymph nodes it has multiplied so much that it overwhelms the antibodies and causes the buboes (Zhaler 26). Before the use of antibiotics and the development of a cure, you had a 50-75% chance of dying within two weeks of catching this …show more content…
This specific outbreak began in China in the 1330s. With trade expanding and the countries of the world having more contact with each other, the plague spread like wildfire. It started in Asia, and spread all the way through England and Russia. Overall it is estimated, that across Europe, around 50 million were killed within the four main years of the Black Death. It started in Europe around 1347, when signs of the Bubonic Plague appeared in Italy. By June of 1348 it had reached Britain all along the trade routes and ports, and soon after London. In 1350, it hit Scotland after they attempted to invade Durham, which had already been suffering from the plague (Throp 8-13). After hitting Russia (1350-1352) the deaths finally began to

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