Analysis Of Bhagavad Gita

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The Bhagavad Gita is regarded as one of the greatest teachings or scriptures of all Asian cultures. The Gita is designed to teach the understanding of a person’s inner self and how a person is to connect with god. The teaching is intended on bringing, in essence, a person into a state of enlightenment connection and communication with god. The teaching is intended as a guide and is more of an oral teaching then a book.
Krishna in the story, who is god incarnate, is in the great battle between all armies of the world and does not choose to take part in the battle in the beginning of the story which shows the great struggle of life and the choices we have to make. Krishna is the charioteer for a great warrior who struggles with the choice he
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The understanding that the body is only a vessel that we use to reach this place of enlightenment, and is about living in this world in relation to the Supreme Being. Krishna teaches that the knowledge of one’s self leads to knowledge of god, that we must strive to learn how to see god and practice detachment can be released.
The three Gunas of nature are goodness, passion, and darkness, darkness is forgetfulness and the tendency to avoid positive action. Passion is trying to seek the rewards and fruits of the world and a person’s labors. Goodness is the spirit of peace. Krishna explains it as an upside down tree that we must cut ourselves free, uncompromising action is sometimes needed to be able to detach our self.
There is two natures, the nature of good and darkness, Krishna says to live to avoid the nature of darkness, there is a sort of warning to connect with a nature of good in all things and that the nature of darkness will lead to anger, lust, and greed and will take us from the path of the good. Knowing the difference between good and evil is the true challenge, and the actions a person takes should reflect one of the two

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