John Hick's Problem Of Evil

Decent Essays
John Hick bases the argument concerning the problem of the evil by questioning the existence of an omnipresent and omnipotent God. Though he presents a positive objection to God, he argues that if God is all loving and the most powerful then he could not create evil on earth. With the ability and powers to eliminate evil on earth, evil still exists though God plans and intends no evil, therefore, there exist likeliness that Hick doubts Gods powers over creations or even Gods existence at all. This essay will focus on the existence of evil and why Christians go through such evil and still believe in Gods existence.
The theologian justifies his stand by stating that some evil exists within the Gods plan so that human beings can rectify their ways immediately after living by the consequences of their action. By his argument, it is clear that evil should exist with extents if
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The major purpose of living is not to acquire all the required comfort or else natural evil would be unjustifiable. Natural evil provides a platform for test and challenges hence natural evil provide a basis for a fair test to all. The natural evils take place naturally, hence anyone is prone to through it irrespective of whether you make good or evil decisions as per the prior argument.
We would not quite be living simply because of the natural evil, though as human beings who are meant to go through temptations, we live to overcome the evils. God exists as omnipresent and omnipotent; therefore, He understands natural evil and should eliminate it for us so that we live without suffering (Hick, 72, 78, 83). He created the universe and everything in it, therefore, He must have created the evils for us to go through. If He is good and does not associate with evil, then does He really exist because evil cannot exist under His watch and witness the creatures on His image and likeness suffer for no apparent

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