Peacekeeping Nation Analysis

Decent Essays
Catch: From 1956-1992 Canada was the the United Nations (UN) Peacekeeping Force largest and single contributor,but dramatically decreased after 1992. Canada in 2011, was 57th of the 193 UN member states. Background Information:
A peacekeeping nation, is a country that strives on helping developing countries, and countries in crisis. Also, a peacekeeping nation is one that doesn’t discriminate, maintains peace in its own country, and helps the United Nations (UN) by contributing money and soldiers that maintain peace without any use of violence. That was Canada from 1956-1992 but Canada’s past does not support its title as a peacekeeping nation.

Argument one: Canadian government discriminated its minority groups, instead of trying to
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Ian Mackenzie stated, “It is the government 's plan to get these people out of B.C. as fast as possible. It is my personal intention, as long as I remain in public life, to see they never come back here. Let our slogan be for British Columbia: No Japs from the Rockies to the seas.” The government, sent Japanese-Canadians to Japanese Internment camps far from cities. There the Japanese-Canadians had to work hard for little pay, and having to share very small cabins with 4 other families.

Citation/footnote #2: "Japanese Internment." CBCnews. Accessed January 16, 2016. http://www.cbc.ca/history/EPISCONTENTSE1EP14CH3PA3LE.html.

Explanation #2: The actions demonstrated toward the Japanese-Canadians by the government of Canada was because Japanese were a minority. The government did not try to create peace between the Japanese and Canadians. Instead the government created tension and hatred between the Japanese-Canadians and Canadian citizens.

Transitional word/phrase #3: To continue,

Point #3: During WWII, Jewish people were Hitler 's target. So when a ship full of Jewish people arrived in Canada they were not let in, because the government appointed an anti-semitic and minority discriminating, Deputy of
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Also, the study showed that Canadians were more concerned about how Canada was perceived to others.

Citation/Footnote #1: "Authoritarian Signaling, Mass Audiences and Nationalist Protest in China." ResearchGate. Accessed January 17, 2016. http://www.researchgate.net/publication/228154990_Authoritarian_Signaling_Mass_Audiences_and_Nationalist_Protest_in_China.

Explanation: This shows that Canada was being negligent towards its own people, and the Canadian government was not trying to help the soldiers recover from a violent battle or bring peace to their families and other Canadian citizens.

Transitional Word/Phrase #2: Secondly,

Point #2: Québécois and English Canadians were never at peace in the past.

Proof #2: In 1963, there was a separatist movement in Canada, and they were called the FLQ (Front de Liberation du Quebec) : Whose goal was to liberate the Quebec citizens from the English power, their motto was “Independence or death”.

Citation/Footnote #2: "CBC.ca - Canadian News Sports Entertainment Kids Docs Radio TV." CBCnews Quiet Movement. November 26, 2015. Accessed January 17, 2016.

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