Antigone By Socrates

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The never ending debate between what your heart wants and the morals that you have obtained is an argument that is seen throughout literature for many years. The play “Antigone” by Socrates clearly exemplifies a character being torn between internal conflicts and responsibilities. The protagonist Antigone is torn between choosing to properly bury her brother or defy her morals and let her brother rot. The conflict results in Antigone doing what she believes is the right which leads to consequences that will eventually prove themselves to be fatal. Antigone has to make a choice of whether to put divine law or natural law first when it comes to how she acts upon burying her brother. Both of Antigone’s brothers died in a battle against each

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