Andrew Jackson Era Of Nationalism

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After a time of triumph and nationalism post War of 1812, Americans were as gleeful as could be. The war ended gallantly with a win in New Orleans by troops led by Andrew Jackson. The presidential race of 1828 consisted of two strong candidates with faithful followers, John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson. Adams was a highly educated man in terms of foreign affairs with his supporters being called National Republicans. On the contrary, Jackson, or "Old Hickory," was a charismatic man of the South with his Jacksonians by his side. This election had three times the amounts of voters than previous years due to the new laws allowing white males above the age of 21 to vote, regardless if they owned land or not. Ultimately, Jackson won and stepped into office being dubbed a man of the people, but in reality he was just a mere circumstance of an era of nationalism. …show more content…
Yes, Jackson brightened America 's day when he led troops to victory during the time of the War of 1812, but …show more content…
He may have been a charming president caring about the poor and rich, but he killed thousands of people for what he thought to have benefited the white males. Jackson essentially massacred one-fourth of the Indians on the Trial of Tears to benefit the minority of the South, white farmers. In addition, is veto of the renewal of the Second National Bank in 1832 obliterated the United States ' economy. His victory in New Orleans is not as incredible after seeing his faults. On the contrary, he did excite America in his inauguration in 1829. Compared to presidents like Monroe, Jackson was much more down to earth and friendly, but being a man of the people takes being more than

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