The Consequences Of Murder In The Crucible By Arthur Miller

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Appearing on Netflix on December 18th, 2015, the popular show Making A Murder defines how one man is convicted of a murder he has not committed. Steven Avery, the man accused – or even framed – has government officials constantly attacking him for crimes he has not perpetrated. Avery has experienced this one other time; he is the target of every possible murder in Wisconsin state. Government officials are mistrusted, the harmless is wrongly alleged, and the Avery family name is destroyed. The same event happens within Arthur Miller’s depiction of the Salem Witch Trials in The Crucible. Victimizing others has its consequences. In The Crucible, Arthur Miller exemplifies that persecution of the innocent destroys society through accusing, mass …show more content…
In The Crucible, countless arrests take place and most of them end in a hanging. When John Proctor asks Mary Warren how many are arrests she replies with, “There be thirty-nine now” (Miller 1271). Within a day over three dozen are arrested. The girls start to shout random names to conceal their doings in the forest. Several of the women convicted by these adolescents confess just to save their own lives. Furthermore, the judges also only seem to believe the girls. On an abundance of accounts, they clarify that the accusations are too crazy to just make up. All the proof is based on the girl’s actions to the defendant; when they squeal in revulsion it is obvious the individual is guilty. Others are truly astonished by the judges favoritism: “We [townspeople] are desperate, sir; we come here three days now and cannot be heard” (Miller 1293). Voicing their innocence (PP), people explain meticulous details but none of the judges employs it as solid evidence. With the girls having all the power, the town is disordered with immense confusion. Chaos helps exemplify how terminating the guiltless can devastate a …show more content…
In The Crucible, countless arrests take place and most of them end in a hanging. When John Proctor asks Mary Warren how many are arrests she replies with, “There be thirty-nine now” (Miller 1271). Within a day over three dozen are arrested. The girls start to shout random names to conceal their doings in the forest. Several of the women convicted by these adolescents confess just to save their own lives. Furthermore, the judges also only seem to believe the girls. On an abundance of accounts, they clarify that the accusations are too crazy to just make up. All the proof is based on the girl’s actions to the defendant; when they squeal in revulsion it is obvious the individual is guilty. Others are truly astonished by the judges favoritism: “We [townspeople] are desperate, sir; we come here three days now and cannot be heard” (Miller 1293). Voicing their innocence (PP), people explain meticulous details but none of the judges employs it as solid evidence. With the girls having all the power, the town is disordered with immense confusion. Chaos helps exemplify how terminating the guiltless can devastate a

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