The Crucible Literary Analysis

799 Words 4 Pages
Literature is a wonderful thing; it explores the relationships between humans and their nature, historical events, and can be used to express one’s creativity. It can also be used to give moral guidance; this was Arthur Miller’s reasoning behind writing The Crucible. In this dramatic retelling of the Salem trials, Miller ensnares his reader with stories of adultery, betrayal, and material greed. His intention, however, is not to entertain with operatic drama. This play is a cautionary tale about finger pointing and its potentially fatal consequences. When people allow hysteria to take over their mind and warp their logic, they harm not only themselves, but their entire society. Communities enraptured with this chaos suffer. Some people, however, …show more content…
He is a respected man in the town of Salem; while he does not regularly attend church, he takes care of a wide farmland and cares for his family. The stage directions tell of his influence in the town, but he is also described as “ . . . a sinner not only against the moral fashion of his time, but his own person conduct” (Miller 1138). He is human and he makes mistakes; his mistake is an affair with a vengeful and infatuated child who lost her head as a result of an oppressive society and previous trauma. The Puritans, however, do not take a blasé attitude to sin. If he publicly confesses to adultery with the seventeen year old Abigail Williams, he will be the reason his family is shunned and outcasted from the church. This turns out to be the least of his problems. Abigail is getting increasingly influential in the community. She has the power to not only threaten his livelihood, but also his well being and wife, Elizabeth. John was not only against the society he was born and raised in. He is struggling with a child. His issues are being caused by an untouchable external …show more content…
Every single person has and will experience hardship; many of it against their own society. John Proctor, however, has a more severe case. He is forced to choose between his own life and his values — his name, his moral code. This is just another example of a hyper-religious society walking on the backs of the ones it is designed to protect. The children corrupt the system; they take over the reigns and twist the perceptions of their people until they became the ones in control. With a deadly mix of radicalism and hysteria, the once-peaceful village became a nightmare for those who didn't fit the perfect Puritanical mold. John Proctor is given a disproportionately punishment to his crime — yes, he commits lechery. Yes, he lies to his community about the affair with Abigail Williams. No individual, however, deserves the suffering these accused witches are forced to experience. Their society turned its back on them; they are beaten, tortured, humiliated, excommunicated. These previously God-loving citizens were warped for straying from their religion’s ideals. At one point, Reverend Hale approaches Proctor and his wife begging the question, “. . . you are rarely in church on Sabbath Day . . . why are you so absent?” (1170). He is consistently targeted for his irregular attendance; he is even shamed when he confesses his dislike towards the current reverend. His society discriminates against him for having his own moral code; it forces him to

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