Minoan Labyrinth In Greek Culture

Great Essays
Greek Mythology can be seen as the merging of human beliefs, imagination, artistic convention and perceptions of divinity. The most interesting and perhaps one of the very few enigmas from the past that continues to blur the lines between reality and mythology is the Minoan Labyrinth at Knossos. A structure so ingenious and elaborate that it went down in history and mythology. The Labyrinth is symbolic a tale of eternal love, deceitful men and vengeful gods – the legend of the Minotaur and goes to demonstrates the cognitive complexity of human perception and his ability to create

The term Labyrinth applies to any sort of a maze, though the difference between a maze and a labyrinth is that a maze offers choices and many outcomes depending
…show more content…
The Labyrinth is located in the ancient island of Crete that belongs to an elaborate palace complex. It was constructed during the “Old Palace” Period (c. 1900-1700 BCE). Tragedy struck and unfortunately it was destroyed during a series of continuing Earthquakes and fires; but it was reconstructed during the “New Palace” Period (c. 1700 – 1450 BCE), which is when the structure started resembling a maze. The structure itself is described as “a baffling array of doors leading to unfamiliar rooms, stairs, yet more corridors, or even dead ends. Admittance could be denied by blocking corridors, and some rooms were accessible only from upper terraces.” (Stokstad and Cothren 86). The complex was built under the rule of King Minos; according to mythology the person he commissioned to build this structure was Daedalus, the same famous architect who also built a wooden cow for Minos’ wife. Legend has it that King Minos, before ascending to the throne, had a tiff with his brothers, who challenged his authority over the throne. He prayed to God Poseidon for a sign of approval, that he was meant to be the rightful king, in the form of a snow white bull; he promised the God that it would be offered in

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Tragically, a large portion of the Parthenon was damaged by an explosion caused by Venetian rockets meeting the ammunition the Ottomans had stored in the center of the structure. The Venetains inevitably looted the valuable objects remaining and destroyed others, leaving it in partial ruin as seen in the present day. Most of the depictions and sculptures were stolen while others were destroyed, the real depiction of the temple can only be seen from the drawings of Jacques Carrey, a Flemish artist in the 1670s. From 1801 to 1803, Thomas Bruce, Lord Elgin, brought most of the surviving sculptures to England. For the past two centuries, they have been on exhibit in the British Museum, although Greece has appealed many times for the return of the “Elgin Marbles” and built a new museum near the Acropolis to house them.…

    • 1705 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    However, he could not have accomplished this without his predecessor, Pope Zacharias, and his relations with King Pippin. In 743, Pippin was declared mayor of the palace. He ruled under Childeric III, who was a mere figurehead. In 750, Pippin decided that he was going to take the Frankish throne with force from the Merovingians, (a history of the church in the middle ages page 72). His motivations are unclear, however, it was most likely that he was frustrated that he did all the work of a ruler and received no credit.…

    • 814 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    There is a total of 15 gods within Zeus 's family. At first he and just his brothers were to rule all, but Zeus decided on many other jurisdictions. To start off there is Zeus, roman myth Jupiter and used thunderbolts to defeat the titans. Homar 's famous phrase can be quoted as "cloud gather", for he controls weather and the sky itself. Zeus created court and once felt Hera 's scorn for trying to tempt fate to stop son, Sarpedon 's dealt.…

    • 743 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The building, one of the oldest in New Orleans, was a “three-story, brick-and-cypress building” (Associated Press, 2014) that had been standing upright for three hundred years in the French Quarter. However, in the middle of October in 2014, the building collapsed. Researchers uncovered many reasons as to the nature of the downfall. These included “structural decay, voracious termites at work on aged wood beams, Louisiana 's humid climate” (Associated Press, 2014). From analyzing this, it is definitely apparent of how entropy is at work here.…

    • 1512 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    However, once they were along the coastlines of Chersonese his army was hit by a huge terrible sea storm which resulted in losing just about every man and wrecking ships causing King Darius to send in his second army later for the next invasion of Greece. In 490 BC, the battle of the Marathon was a major battle that caused the second invasion of the Persian Wars. The Persians once again charged forth to punish Athens. The commanders leading this second invasion were Datis and Artaphernes who led about twenty-five thousand men with one eighty ships. The Persians sailed down the coast of Greece and landed at the bay of Marathon, about couple miles away from Athens.…

    • 1242 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Oedipus, then, boasts of his great ability to solve riddles through the use of his vast knowledge. However, Teiresias points out that Oedipus’ knowledge has kept him blind to the most devastating mystery of them all: Oedipus, in his search for justice, has damned himself into his own ruin and destruction. This exchange between Oedipus and Teiresias displays the difference between wisdom, which Teiresias possesses and respects, and plain knowledge, which Oedipus values and attempts to manipulate while obtaining justice. Furthermore, Teiresias reveals that it is Oedipus’ arrogance and faith in knowledge that leads him right down the path of justice and to his ultimate destruction. Although the downfall of Oedipus is undeniably tragic and full of misery, it can be observed that he brought his own undoing unto himself by trying to do the right thing.…

    • 1416 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The time setting of this play might suggest that the Gods of Greek Mythology caused the tragic events. That is completely untrue. With that being said, the best argument to prove this theory wrong is; how could the Gods do something if there is no credible proof that they actually exist? Greek Mythology is exactly what it says it is, a myth. There are three important reasons why Greek Mythology was created; to explain unnatural occurrences, to separate people into different groups, and to give rules on how to live a happy life.…

    • 775 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Fantasy and reality are like twins: sometimes it is hard to distinguish between the two. Scholars of all ages have discussed around this theme. In the allegory of the cave of Plato’s work The Republic, the cavemen see the shadows cast on the walls, and they regards that fantasy as the reality (Haarlem, 1604). There are a few intelligent individuals who are fortunate enough to see the original statues that cast shadows on the walls, nevertheless they are still seeing the fantasies because the statues are only copies of the outside world that represents reality (Haarlem, 1604). As technology progresses, civilizations are equipped with more advanced tools to understand the nature.…

    • 1568 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Pygmalion And My Fair Lady

    • 1577 Words
    • 7 Pages

    conception devoid of human qualities. Nor may one forget the legends more recent and popular reincarnations. George Bernard Shaw’s play Pygmalion and its musical My Fair Lady. There is something very unsettling about myth Pygmalion myth and many of its offshoots. They strike the reader or viewer as defying the logical balance that typically attends Greek mythology and most of all the transgression known as hubris; that is, the human conceit that a mere mortal could undertake a task that is the proper domain of the gods.…

    • 1577 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    First, Ibrahim constantly tried to discover the presence of God in his life. He grew up in a Pagan environment, but did not believe in what he had been taught. Unlike the Jewish faith, Abraham is not only considered a prophet, but also a friend of God (Siddiqui). Before David became a King, he was the warrior who killed the giant, Goliath. He defeated the giant with a sling shot used in God 's name which would later make him King (King David).…

    • 1280 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays