Analysis Of Paul's Letter To The Philippians

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While in chains, I declare to preach the truth no matter what. In mindful agony I remain in God’s presence, and trust in my faith. Paul is preaching the good news; the truth that Christ indeed died on the cross for our sins. “The gospel to which Paul refers is the good news that the crucified Jesus – not the Roman emperor is Lord.” (Gorman, 2003) In large part, Jesus was an example of how we should be as Christians. Even though He was God Himself, He never demanded His rights as God. He acted like a slave would act, being like average man. “Early Christians carved out a position for themselves in the imperial world as a whole and substantiated their following of a crucified slave as Lord.” (Smit, 2016) He even died a criminal’s death on the …show more content…
In Pauls’ letter to the Philippians he addresses his situation being imprisoned, but also addresses the internal and external pressures facing the church. He also affirms his partnership with the church. Paul wants the Philippians to face these pressures in a way Christ would. “Even in his imprisonment, then, Paul has continued to be concerned both about the spread of the gospel (1:7) and about his converts and friends, particularly those in Philippi –‘all of you’”. (Gorman, 2003) Paul’s central message of this letter is to me, unity with the Philippians in their beliefs and worship of the gospel. The joy, hope, and love Christ can show us by living a life more like and closer to Christ. We are all one spirit when we all rejoice in Him, we do not fear those who oppose us or wish to control …show more content…
We should strive to keep God’s house together (church). The house of God should be filled with the love of Christ, through His people. The gathering of people in His house is something that should be as precious as the world’s greatest treasures. “It is to this story that He and the Philippians bear witness in preaching, singing, living, and suffering. (Gorman, 2003) The church had internal and external pressures that led to an unwillingness to partner with Paul and the gospel any further. Internally, there was selfish ambition and strife within the church, maybe even within its leadership. They also faced opposition associated with following Jesus. Externally, they faced Jewish resistance and a corrupt world of a Roman

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