Analysis Of No Justice By David Conley

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As someone who already listens to music constantly, I was thrilled to find out I would be given the opportunity to write a paper on any song I choose. Music speaks to me in a way things such as books don’t. Specifically, I listen to rap music, most of which is typically performed by people of African American race. Going into this assignment there was no doubt I wanted to make a song connection with race, primarily because it is a subject I feel very passionate about. The song “No Justice” by Ty Dolla $ign instantly came to mind. I had already loved the song and listened to it enough times to understand the lyrics and not just the beat that goes with it. I found it inspiring when I noticed he was telling a story of the ongoing inequality …show more content…
Especially as of recently, there have been many controversial issues over people of darker skin tones and police. The African American people are accused of something and then are even held at gunpoint, often shot. Police brutality is an ongoing issue where citizens of darker races are treated in an unjust manner. Through his song “No Justice”, Ty Dolla $ign is passionate on the matter. “…he say you look suspicious, and you fit the description of a call about a robbery, then some more cops came.” He is attempting to emphasize the point that the accused black men and even women aren’t given a fair chance to defend themselves, instead they are often wrongly accused. From there things only go downhill. “I know this could be the end of me” is an interesting way for Ty to speak on the fact they have no hope when in these situations. With an altercation involving people of authority, many African American people aren’t optimistic on a positive outcome. Not only that, but he touches on the subject on how “killing us is legal”. This due to the fact policemen aren’t always held responsible for their unjust actions. Like Conley, Ty Dolla $ign is raising awareness to that unfair situation that is unfortunately a common problem in our society, especially as of

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