Malthus's Theory Of Overpopulation

Improved Essays
In this essay, I will argue that Malthus’s theory of overpopulation is not relevant, especially within contemporary politics because the problem is not “overpopulation.” There are other factors that must be taken into consideration: technological advances, preventative checks, and the total wealth of a country. Malthus was one of the first philosophers in the nineteenth century to attempt to apply mathematical concepts to society. The book foreshadowed a wretched and grim future with the notion that the population would increase geometrically (e.g 2,4,6,8…) doubling in twenty-five years. But food production would only increase arithmetically (e.g 1,2,3,4…) which would result in famine and starvation spreading among the lower class population unless births were controlled. However, the text overlooked potential improvements in agriculture such as steam-powered machines, chemical fertilizers, and genetically modified organisms (also known as GMOs). Malthus was writing during a time when technological advances were not as sufficient and poverty was a norm within society. Thus, the implication of “people can reproduce faster than they can increase food production,” mentality formed. For example, advances within food production has given nations an abundance to distribute to individuals. …show more content…
As a result, it would provide a smaller population, less poverty, and better food quality. However, all these are natural catastrophes which are not related to overpopulated countries. They visit even those countries where the population is on the decline or motionless such as Japan and

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    He could not predict that agriculture would become industrialized and that agriculture techniques would improve. Malthus believed that a rise in population growth would result in a total lack of food , but that does not hold true today. A resource such as food is in abundant supply and is not dropping due to overpopulation. Rather, people in certain areas go hungry because resources are unevenly distributed across the…

    • 815 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Brilliant Essays

    Jared Diamond in his article, “The Worst Mistake in the History of the Human Race,” rattles off many negative implications left by this efficient and still followed practice. He claims that “the diets of hunter gatherers provided more protein and a better balance of nutrients” (Diamond 2). Diamond also asserts that hunter gatherers were more physically healthier before the emergence of producers with multiple health problems such as malnutrition, starvation and the like. Along with these problems, he saw class and gender divisions sprout during the onset of the agricultural revolution (Diamond 4). Diamond claims these issues resulted from the departure from hunting-gathering, but in all fairness, there are many factors that contribute to failures in health and social structures.…

    • 1247 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Brilliant Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Green Revolution Essay

    • 1347 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The countries that need development aid cannot benefit from the green revolutions practices because the type of agriculture helped by the green revolution is not the same as the type of agriculture practiced by those who our aid is intended to help today. The green revolution helped reduce the prevalence of hunger in Asia. Food became more abundant in the market place and more affordable for the poor. The green revolution also increased the productivity of farms resulting in more income for farmers. Criticism of the green revolution has been off base.…

    • 1347 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Additionally, it’s becoming difficult to avoid eating GMO foods. The environment may be important, but it’s nothing without the people in it. Genetically modifying crops to grow in certain locations would negatively affect farmers and consumers, thus leading to larger issues than the health of the environment The human body’s immune system is strong, but not strong enough to fight against unnatural, genetically modified foods. Studies have shown that since GMOs were introduced,…

    • 1182 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Though food was not genetically modified in the 1900s, the time period of Upton Sinclair’s novel, The Jungle, the standards for food were much worse. The advantages of the modern labor and food production system, such as food labels and availability, greatly outweigh the misfortune of more genetically modified organisms. The greatest improvement of the modern food market is food labels. Though many individuals ignore this valuable information, it can be a great tool in choosing what food is the most healthful. In the 1800-1900s, a label on a can of food could claim that the…

    • 474 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    So was it a decision to start growing modified foods without adequate accuracy. In developed countries businesses are highly accurate in their steps because of the government’s restrictions and regulations, but what about developing countries? Do they have these restrictions? Apart of answering the rhetorical question, we must find a way how to make the system of genetic modifications work on us, not…

    • 725 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    It may seem that there has to be a major difference between organic foods and conventional foods, but there isn’t. Organic foods have a few more advantages over conventional food, but there is nothing major, and would not be worth the extra money. Paying more for organic foods is not worth it, as buying conventional foods is worth your money. There may be some benefits with the organic food, but really it is not worth it. Organic foods are not worthwhile, as conventional foods are almost just as good as organic…

    • 978 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Genetically Modified Crops

    • 1154 Words
    • 5 Pages

    For a majority of countries around the world, agriculture remains at the forefront of their economic stature. The portion of countries that have moved away from agriculture, tend to work on and improve manufacturing and technology-based businesses. Even though agriculture is not a priority amongst the job market in more developed countries, like the United States, it is still important due to being the most reliable source of food. So applying advancements to agriculture seems like a novel idea, and scientists started experimenting with the idea of genetically modified (GM) crops. GM crops have become more and more prevalent across developed countries, but other countries still have yet to see the improvements GM crops could make towards their development.…

    • 1154 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Over the past few years, the federal minimum wage has been the subject of much political and social debate. The federal minimum wage was passed in 1938 to provide a standard of living and fair wages to low-skilled workers. Throughout its history, the federal minimum wage has been adjusted periodically to maintain its real value, which is continually lost due to inflation. Republicans oppose an increase in the minimum wage because they believe it will increase unemployment and harm our economy. On the other hand, Democrats support the raise by citing evidence from past minimum wage increases, in which there was little to no effect on unemployment rates.…

    • 1910 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    On top of that, due to the limited technology and rural infrastructure, a transition to a more automated agricultural market out be extremely costly. This would lower the cost of food but if the subsidy was removed, the living cost might not change substantially. However this would free up capital to better implement in the future to promote growth, rather than having to cover food costs per annum. With such a massive population, food production is of the utmost importance. But through the Government subsidizing the cost of food production through manual labor, not only does this promote inefficiency, but prevents the diversification of the workforce, leading to less specialization and is unsustainable within the long run.…

    • 1850 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays