Analysis Of Malcolm Gladwell's Small Change: Why The Revolution Will Not Be Tweeted

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Social media has a major impact on political activism and media as a whole. In Malcolm Gladwell’s essay, “Small Change: Why the Revolution Will Not Be Tweeted”, Gladwell argues about the relationships between social media and social activism. Gladwell insists that social activism needs strong connections rather than weak networking. Gladwell states different arguments that leads to many valid viewpoints. He clarifies two alternatives: The relationship between strong ties and weak ties and hierarchy organizations and networks. However, social media has revived the forms of social activism by spreading messages at a faster rate and joining different political views easily through hashtags or public posts.

Malcolm Gladwell’s essay, “Small Change: Why the Revolution Will Not Be Tweeted”, tells a story about four college students and their social activism. The four college students went out to eat lunch at a nearby restaurant in Greensboro, North Carolina. As one of the four students started ordering, the waitress said, “We don’t serve Negroes here” (Gladwell, 399). This response lead to a political protest outside the restaurant. The student’s political
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However, I disagree with his viewpoints on social media being surrounded by only weak ties. I believe that social media is a platform where strong ties can be developed through connections and communication. In addition, social media doesn’t need a centralized leadership structure, everybody is a leader of their own. Therefore, social media is a key tool for social activism towards creating opportunities by spreading a message to different causes at a faster rate and help further political interest within society towards developing a mutual connection with

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