Analysis Of Jordan Baker In The Great Gatsby

Better Essays
Jordan Baker: Deceit for the Win In The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald uses techniques such as characterization and tone with Jordan Baker to criticize the difference between appearance and reality, as well as the corruption inherent in upper-class society during the Roaring Twenties. Fitzgerald characterizes Jordan as seemingly-innocent and honest, when in reality she is immoral. Nick narrates, “At first I was flattered to go places with her, because she was a golf champion, and everyone knew her name…” (Fitzgerald 57). Fitzgerald characterizes Jordan as having a good reputation due to her fame as a sports champion. He even uses the diction that Nick was “flattered” to be with this popular girl. However, he only felt this way “at first.” …show more content…
Nick describes, “Her gray sun-strained eyes looked back at me with polite reciprocal curiosity of a wan, charming, discontented face” (Fitzgerald 11). Fitzgerald describes Jordan’s eyes as “gray,” expressing her boredom, as if she does not expect much from the West Egger Nick. It also shows her discontent perspective on life, as she sees everything through dull, gray lenses. She continues: “‘You live in West Egg’ she remarked contemptuously” (Fitzgerald 11). Fitzgerald also includes the color archetype of Jordan’s gray eyes representing a separation of classes; he characterizes Jordan as being condescending towards West Egg, reflecting the tension between those born wealthy and those who built up their wealth from a poor …show more content…
Nick says, “Jordan Baker instinctively avoided clever, shrewd men, and now I saw that this was because she felt safer on a plane where any divergence from a code would be thought impossible. She was incurably dishonest. She wasn’t able to endure being at a disadvantage…” (Fitzgerald 58). Fitzgerald uses a didactic tone to describe Jordan’s character: she feels more secure around men who are not very intelligent. As a partygoer, Jordan appreciates company but is careful to choose the right people to be around – she attaches herself to those who are not intelligent to feel confident about herself. Fitzgerald expresses Jordan’s intent as a modern independent woman to stay away from clever males who could try to establish dominance over her. Fitzgerald uses the diction “incurably dishonest” to describe Jordan, who always likes to be on top of the situation at hand, and will go about dishonest ways in order to get what she wants.
Jordan’s selfishness represents the attitudes of wealthy Roaring Twenties people. She intends to main control over her life and to have her own way. She tells Nick, “‘Well, I met another bad driver, didn’t I? I mean it was careless of me to make such a wrong guess. I thought you were rather an honest, straightforward person’” (Fitzgerald 177). Jordan’s accusatory tone in this analogy

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Jordan is, “a professional golfer who is a liar and a cheat”(Wershoven 1). Her success seems to be a good quality, along with the fact that she knows what she wants and is looking for in a relationship. A bad quality of Jordan is that she is a careless and dishonest person. Jordan clearly knows what she is looking for when, “... she was engaged to another man”(Fitzgerald 177). Jordan knew that hers and Nick’s relationship was not gonna end up well, so she decided to move on because she knew it was the best for her.…

    • 1041 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Catherine Linton, Cathy Earnshaw’s daughter, meets favorable, yet inadequately educated, Hareton. She immediately distinguishes Hareton’s incompetency in reading and degrades him for his flaw. Catherine mocks him continuingly calling him “stupid” and a “dunce” (Bronte 213). Catherine’s wealth of education and knowledge cause her to act in a condescending manner towards her friend Hareton. This establishes a parallel between Catherine and her mother, who derides Heathcliff for being extremely filthy and base after integrating herself with the rich.…

    • 1017 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    She is also convinced that "happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance and so even with an unlikeable man, marriage is a risk always worth taking". Elizabeth Bennet finds Charlotte’s views on marriage embarrassing, illogical and morally disquieting. She takes them first as a joke but later as a "most humiliating picture" when Charlotte finally gives her consent to marry Mr. Collins. Although Elizabeth feels that Charlotte’s opinion of marriage is not exactly like her own, she thinks that "when called into action, Charlotte would rise above practical necessity, prize affection above status and choose consensual admiration over social prudence". Instead, to her dismay she feels Charlotte "had sacrificed every better feeling to…

    • 1107 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Lastly, Jordan uses people to achieve her goal, Nick states that she is “incurably dishonest.” She will do whatever it takes to better herself. She has no sympathy for others. She uses competitive golf as a way to achieve wealth and power. She would achieve wealth through winning tournaments and power through playing just because she is a female and defies the stereotypical role of…

    • 1040 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Others treat Tesman this way because they know they can get away with it without having to worry about his retaliation. Ibsen intentionally portrays Tesman in this vulnerable position to introduce a relatively virtuous character that the audience can use to contrast with his more morally ambiguous characters. Similar to her control over Tesman, Hedda engineers Lovborg’s devastation because she wants to and she knows she can. Hedda’s boredom leads her to want to have “her fingers in a man's destiny,” (Ibsen). Lovborg’s inability to control himself makes him a target of Hedda’s influence and his friend Thea’s concern.…

    • 1172 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    If Daisy went against society’s notions, she would have lost her reputation and common respect. When telling Nick about her and Tom’s daughter, she mentions how she was disappointed it was a girl, saying, “I hope she 'll be a fool -that 's the best thing a girl can be in this world” (Fitzgerald 45). Living while being watched by society’s judgemental ideas, Daisy does not want her daughter to be subject to that. By being the fool society so praises, she would live a “happy” life. The time preaches that it is best for the man to do the work, while they sit back being a good hostess and mother.…

    • 1374 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Instead of loving the person underneath the skin, they lust over the other for superficial values and focus on the wrong things. But Dev is just a player, who does not even protest when Miranda ends the affair, and Miranda is left in pieces. Lahiri prominently displayed the theme lust camouflaged as love will break a relationship for the better through Miranda’s character development because from the pain of loss, she is able to mature and learns to love herself for who she is instead of forcing the roles of gender, culture, and age upon herself. After the couple’s separation, Miranda finds herself sitting outside the Mapparium and gazing at its beauty, which signifies how she accepts herself for who she is without needing a man to validate her worth. As the fire of their relationship diminishes and turns into ashes, Miranda rises from the embers into a…

    • 1253 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    What makes this farce feminist and captivating is the reversal of gender roles in pursuit of a partner. Traditionally a female is expected to deny or accept a spouse from an arranged marriage. In this instance Miss Hardcastle goes above and beyond and takes responsibility for her own choice by pretending to be a lowly barmaid to court and conquer her suitor. Here Miss Hardcastle is a bastion for feminism because she sees a man and goes after him, she is willing to do what she has to, including stooping to get what she…

    • 728 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women were capable of finding themselves according to Philips. However, after they would find themselves it would not matter as it was skewed by the value of marriage. As a result their choices were as free “As angels', who with greedy choice / Are yet determined to their joys” because of men (Philips I, 9-10). Astell agreed with both writers on having women finding their means in life. She also writes: “a woman were duly principled and taught to know the world … women would marry more discreetly, and demean themselves better in a married state than some people say…

    • 1308 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Therefore, whenever Mr. Collins’ says anything “Charlotte wisely [does] not hear” it. If she did pay attention to what he is saying, she will always be embarrassed, because he is always saying foolish things, or compliments women, even though he is married. Fortunately, Mr. Collins is seen as unimportant to Charlotte’s eyes, making it easy for her to forget about him, which brings “a great deal of comfort [in the house].” Charlotte’s abilities to forget about him, allows her to be able to relax, and do her own tasks without having any type of disturbance form Mr. Collins and his thoughts. Charlotte’s reason for marriage is based on the convenience of having money and a home, while Mr. Collins reasons for marriage is to please someone else. Their marriage is heavily influenced by…

    • 1045 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays