Analysis Of Everyday Use By Alice Walker

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Alice Walker, in full Alice Malsenior Walker was born on 9th February 1944 in Eatonton Georgia U.S. and is now one of the country’s best-selling writers of literary fiction.
Alice walker’s life was life of any African American in 1940s. She was deprived of all the basic amenities and discrimination was rampant all around, which Alice later started expressing through her short stories, novel, poems etc. More than ten million copies of her books are in print." Walker has now become a focal spokesperson and symbol for black feminism and has earned critical and popular acclaim as a major American novelist and intellectual. Her work is dedicated to a vision of transforming the oppressed state of her race
Walker was born in Eatonton, Georgia, a southern
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It was published in 1973 as part of Walker’s short stories collection. In “Everyday Use,” Alice Walker takes up what is a recurrent theme in her work: the representation of the harmony as well as the conflicts and struggles within African-American culture. “Everyday Use” focuses on an encounter between members of the rural Johnson family. This encounter––which takes place when Dee (the only member of the family to receive a formal education) and her male companion return to visit Dee’s mother and younger sister Maggie––is essentially an encounter between two different interpretations of, or approaches to, African-American culture. Walker employs characterization and symbolism to highlight the difference between these interpretations and ultimately to uphold one of them, showing that culture and heritage are parts of daily life. Alice Walker does a proficient job at blurring the difference between the stereotypes of rural black American women with the realities that make up their …show more content…
All the narratives address the theme of racial discrimination within personalized context of economic and social challenges. Alice gives voice to the oppressed and terrorized women, who have no sense belonging. Alice being an example of the same woman narrates incidences from her past lives in order to give proof to the readers and hope to the protagonist to become like her and voice. Although many of the criticisms are controversial on her views of black man and their abuse towards black women, her writing cannot be narrowed down only to that, there is much more than that present in Alice Walker’s writing. Her feelings, morals and the opinions Walker has towards women, sexuality, and racial equality shine through her works of all

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