Deinstitutionalization In Canada

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Introduction:
Deinstitutionalization of mental health facilities has been a major issue in Canada for centuries. Deinstitutionalization is a process of closing down facilities and integrating these patients into society (Lamb, 2010). In the 17th and 18th centuries, very little was known about mental illness. In these times, it was believed that institutionalization had negative impacts on both patients and staff and these symptoms of mental illness were associated with criminality and evil spirits (Morrow, 2010). Mental health is such a prominent issue in Canada and affordable care is scarce. In March of 2009, more than 6000 Ontarians were forced out of institutions and into their communities when the last three large-scale government run institutions
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Mental illness is a largely stigmatized topic and it leads most patients to fear treatment options and seeking care. Often times, the relatively unprepared communities are not supportive of these patients and make them feel more out of place. A lack of community support causes relapse and therefore, readmission to hospitals (Yearwood, 2008). Another weakness comes from the fact that, often times, patients in these facilities are unable to care for themselves. This means they rely heavily on local centers, or support systems. If these networks are not available to them they have nowhere to …show more content…
Issues such as one’s life experiences, environments and social and economic conditions also determine the state of a person’s health. These social and economic conditions are known as the social determinants of health and they have a very large impact on one’s mental and physical health (Marmott, 2013). Research shows that the social determinants can be more important than health care or lifestyle choices in influencing health. Because Canada is such a rich country, it is easy to mask the reality surrounding poverty rates, social exclusion, homelessness and discrimination (Marmott, 2013). This is why the issue of deinstitutionalization may not be such a large issue to a lot of people; not many people know the realities of it. Our social safety net is poor despite all we spend on health care; this means that despite initiatives to keep those who are most vulnerable to poverty from falling below poverty level, it is hard to do so (Rachlis, 2005). Mentally ill patients are discriminated against in the workplace because they are seen as independent or unreliable. This makes it more difficult to find a steady source of income and avoid falling into poverty levels. Institutionalization may treat some patients but when these facilities close down and the patients are put back into the environment that made them ill, it does no good. This illustrates the “revolving door syndrome” in

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