Foucault's Culture

Improved Essays
Approach
The Soviet 60s had similar cultural processes to those in Western Europe: it was a time of intellectual protest and liberalization. While France had the Revolution of 1968, the Soviet intellectual started liberty rights movement and in the 1970s, they were ostracized as dissidents. Strikingly, Bakhtin’s culture theory has similarities with French philosophical systems of the same time. First, his approach reminds of Foucault’s “History of Sexuality” and Guattari’s “Chaosmosis.” Bakhtin defined culture as the set of the ideas, which he called “forms of thinking” ; similar to episteme in Foucault. Forms of thinking, according to Bakhtin, operate with three elements: material, method, and content. These elements would be specification to Foucault’s “machinery of power,” which is the set of institutions that teach people how to behave. These institutions write scripts for thinking rather than just discipline and punish for disobedience. Foucault called those scripts discourses. There’s no escape from discourses, and there is nothing besides them between human and his or her being. The personal position is a combination of “strategies” proposed by a particular culture. According to Bakhtin,
…show more content…
By no accident, “Kyivproekt,” chose avant-garde style to reconstruct the city central street, Khreshchatyk, in 1954. The main building, a skyscraper, hotel “Moskva,” was built on the place of the first Kyiv’s skyscraper by Ginsburg (1912-1944) ruined in 1944. The reconstruction project was led by Anatol Dobrovolsky, who became the city architect four years before. In 1950, he received Stalin’s award of II range for “technology development, an organization of mass production and implication of hollow building and architectural ceramic.” After Kreshchatyk was restored from ruins, Dobrovsky worked on the Main Railway Station and Airport reconstruction, also made in avant-garde

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    What Is The Bhagavad Gita

    • 1278 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Essentially, our understanding of reality is simply a constructed idea, dependent on the body and the mind. The Dao, translated as the ‘path’ or way’, is an actual living experience that we cannot label in simple terms. The Dao is finding the universe and being completely harmonized with its ever-changing, limitless nature. The Gita shares similar conceptions with the Daodejing, what lies behind our true self are the desires that pollute us; people must live without superficial aspirations that only provide for themselves The Gita doesn’t specify the problem of labeling, but the Daodejing articulates that names are unable to describe change, which is the very nature of the Dao. Labeling what is limitless, and what surges through every fiber of existence, is unattainable.…

    • 1278 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Custom House History

    • 980 Words
    • 4 Pages

    In 1979 New York City 's Landmarks Preservation Commission made outside and inside of the customs house spaces into a city landmark (GSA). This would save the customs house from being demolished. The Customs House was an example of one buildings which had its space repurposed and given new use after 1976 by the GSA (GSA). In 1979 Congress gave $26,500,000 to restore and repair the customs house. The project started in 1983 and was finished by 1994 (GSA).…

    • 980 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Human history is comprised of many strides against oppression and revolutionary upbringings. Two notable revolutions, the French, beginning in 1789, and the Mexican, beginning in 1910, had varying goals and outcomes. France wished to debunk the unfair social stratification and the limited rights of the third-estate, ultimately leading to the abolishment of this oppressive regime, while Mexico wished to overthrow an oppressive dictatorship, which eventually ended in the endowment of unprecedented rights to the Mexican people. Eighteenth century Europe viewed governing a civilization through the means of power and control, rather than social and individual needs. In France, monarchs followed a socio-political system titled the old regime, in…

    • 668 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    My mentors in my philosophical journey were the noteworthy philosophes Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Rousseau. Montesquieu was an influential philosophe. He poked fun at the French society, and he spoke of relativism, the idea that knowledge, truth, and morality exist in relation to culture and are not absolute. My companion believed in a political system where one branch could not become a tyranny (Mannion 89). He wrote The Spirit of Laws, which was a crucial novel in the revolution.…

    • 795 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As for taxes, the new economic theory of capitalism, delineated revolution by Adam Smith in his “Wealth of Nations,” arguing for free trade, found stark contrast in the minds of the colonists with the taxes and harsh restrictions created by Britain. In France, taxes also became the figure of criticism, by the bourgeoisie and the peasants/labourers. But these taxes were merely the figurehead of criticism; the true and most important criticisms were towards the tyranny of the Monarchs George III and Louis XVI and the arbitrary power of the crown. The ideas of the Philosophes, particularly those of Montesquieu, Voltaire, Locke, and Rousseau, laid the foundation for these criticisms. Montesquieu created the idea of checks and balance intended to remedy the concentration and abuse of power in the current system; his ideas became heavily implemented into the United States constitution and served to fuel the revolution.…

    • 1094 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Vanderwood states, “Francois-Xavier Guerra emphasizes a profound cultural conflict founded in the contradictions inherent in Mexican society and aggravated by the imposition of modern ideas and practices on a largely traditional society.” (Vanderwood, 155-6). Guerra also mentions the moment where Madero’s administration comes in and challenges the Porfiriato administration. Vanderwood also states that because Guerra drew on the public sources he uses some mistakes in the original text go to the study and they are brought into his own analysis. Guerra explains the value of his “prosopography” in Le Mexique de l’Ancien Regime a la Revolution as something that offers beyond biographical ‘dry’ data, which sheds light on the social and political events that were emerging locally during that era through individual memoirs, biographies, and histories. His outlook on the Mexican Revolution is more of a micro to macro scope.…

    • 929 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Like the space Derrida speaks of in his notion of text, Quentin’s section draws us into a space where there are no boundaries between the real and the fictive, the present and the past, and the external world and the internal world of mind. Derrida’s reading of Blanchot’s “La folie du jour” reveals how the text eclipses the clear divisions between what comes before and what after and what is in the text and what outside, by the narrative’s self-repeating process. Incidentally, Derrida argues that all narrative takes place as repetition, that is “requotation of the story [without quotation marks] . . .…

    • 1433 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Burke conceptualizes rhetoric as inherent to identity as humans and that we are rhetorical beings who persuade through language: “For rhetoric as such is not rooted in any past condition of human society. It is rooted in an…

    • 875 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    According to Descartes, the thought helps realize who a human being is. Furthermore, it does not need anything else except itself as the reason of self-consciousness, which turns out the only obvious reality. In particular, the explanation of all objects of the external world is expressed through the correlation with self, regarding identity. In short, personal identity appears to be the reason and inception of everything happening in the world. At the same time, the cognitive skills of an individual limit the…

    • 866 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Parmenides Poem Analysis

    • 1919 Words
    • 8 Pages

    The reality of our world is one whole piece where all things are in some way or form already made. Things like time and space, life and death, and good and evil are concepts generated by persuasion, and sense-perception and thus not logically possible. The pome is a tool used to state that all things exists in a concept of a completed whole, and this whole is our…

    • 1919 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays