Anne Moody Coming Of Age Analysis

Amazing Essays
The counter-society development of the 1960s was a response created by the recorded amnesia from the 1950s. This forced peace, which is known as the "false accord", was broken by the impacts a generational hole. The generational crevice permitted the discontent to uncover the "shrouded" prejudice of the United States, subsequently making a counter-social development. In part 22 of Anne Moody's personal history, The Coming of Age in Mississippi, she describes the start of this counter-social development, which turns into the Civil Rights development. She delineates the different ways African-Americans opposed bigotry and the troubles in evolving society. Through the utilization of an account, she finds herself able to unite the impacts of the …show more content…
During the 1950s, the Baby Boomer generation became more rebellious towards their parents. Separatism and individualism began to take root and caused the younger generation to distance themselves from the older generation. The younger generation are detached that they do not understand the reasoning of the older parents. Moody’s mother is deathly afraid for Anne’s wellbeing when Anne informs her that she is participating in the NAACP protests. Her mother threatens her to stop or else she would not be able to return home. Not understanding her mother’s wishes, Anne mistakes her mother’s intensions. Rather than thinking of her family’s safety, Anne selfishly thinks of herself. “I was so damn mad after her letter, I felt like taking the NAACP convention to Centreville” (Moody 284). She acted like the typical defiant teenager, or a three-year-old, deliberately disobeying her parents. Moody thought that her mother’s reason to keep her in the house when she returned home was because Moody did not come home often; and so her mother wanted to spend as much time with her. However, this was not the real intention. As a mother, she was very worried about the increasing about of danger caused by Moody’s activism. Wanting to keep Moody alive, her mother condemned her actions because they caused much harm to the family, community, and other people in the country. As described in the previously, the white supremacists’ activities amplified as blacks became more active. Thus Moody’s mother grew more anxious about her daughter’s safety. In addition the simple disconnect with parents, there is also a disconnection with the older black leaders. The Civil Rights movement was primarily driven by the youth. The youths’ inexperience, stubbornness, and naivety allowed them to demand for radical change. They were not afraid to be arrested and beaten by the

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