An Evening Thought Poem Analysis

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Christianity has always been looked at as the savior of the African American people. Although the bible was used as a weapon to oppress African Americans, during slavery, it was also viewed as a beacon of hope during times of immense struggle. African Americans were able to evaluate the bible and reconfigure it to their specific needs. The following works will explain the transformation of the connection between black identity and religion through the chronological works of African American poets during different eras in American history.
During slavery African Americans created songs to represent the impact of labor and oppression on slaves. What was later became known as a spiritual, became the framework for genres such as blues, gospel and jazz. The spiritual, Been in The Storm So Long, is a perfect representation of how African Americans used religion as a guide. They were taught that prayers could get them out of their oppressive situation, in the reading the main character is asking God to simply give him more time to pray. Rather than fighting to get themselves out of a situation they are
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Hammon uses various religious word and expressions to symbolize slavery and oppression of African Americans. The author also used double language so that his poem reads differently depending on the audience. To White Americans during the Enlightenment period religion was becoming less obligatory, instead there was a focus on technology and science. For Hammon’s white audience he revived the ideas of religion and life after death. For the interpretation of his black audience he was giving hope in the end of slavery and faith toward everyday struggles. At this time blacks did not have anything, but through poems and sermons they had religion. Religion gave them hope that in time the injustices would end. At this time hope became enough for you to

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