Albert Bandura Case Study

970 Words 4 Pages
On December 4, 1925, Albert Bandura became the sixth addition and first son to his family. Bandura grew up in Mundare, Alberta, Canada, on a wheat farm that his parents had just bought. He would work the farm everyday while also attending school. His school was the only school in town and did not have a lot of material for the kids. Two teachers would cover the entire school curriculum, which made it hard for everyone to learn, so kids ended up having to teach themselves most of the time. As bandura got older his parents encouraged him to explore more, so one summer he went out and got a job at a furniture manufacturing plant where he acquired carpentry skills which would later help him in college. After he completed high school, he got another …show more content…
The aggressive toys consisted of a mallet, peg board, dart gun and a three-foot Bobo doll. The non-aggressive toys consisted of a tea set, crayons, stuffed animals and plastic farm animals. Like stage two, the child enters the room alone and has 20 minutes to play with the toys while behind a one-way mirror Bandura and other Psychologist are making observations. They made observations every 5 seconds which gave 240 response units for each child. Other behaviors that the children portrayed that didn’t imitate the models behavior were also recorded. For example, one child started hitting the Bobo …show more content…
Then he showed the same thing but the model was punished. When the kids were introduced to the toys, the first group beat up the doll while the children in the second group did not. But when Bandura told the second group of kids they would get rewarded if they imitated the video, they started beating up the doll. Both groups had learned from watching the model but the group that watched the successful model imitated the aggression with no prompting. This result led to Bandura researching the links between television violence and the effect it has on an adolescent’s

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