Definition Essay On State Racism

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The terms nation, nationality, and nationalism are ideas that are not only strange but ambiguous. They become very hard terms to define within the real world. They are developed through a myriad of differing parts. These can be both tangible and ideological things. Physically people often identify themselves based on where they live or their ancestors are from. National identity gets more complicated than that because people identify religiously, ideologically, politically or have a sense of pride. The intangibility of these are what make the pinpointing of a specific definition difficult. The dictionary defines ‘Nation’ as “a large aggregate of people united by common descent, history, culture, or language, inhabiting a particular country …show more content…
This in turn comes into conflict with the beliefs and values of the ‘other’ as they do not conform to the traditional values of the white, Christian male with their identities and beliefs. It is ultimately the state apparatus of the American majority against non-traditional sets of values. This mentality of state racism can lead to political blindness and can cause people to act irrational. Perfect example is with the current election, in which people on the right are ‘fighting’ to build a wall between the US and Mexico, as well as implement a comprehensive plan to ban all Muslims from entering the country. Given the first example is purely impractical, the second one is blatantly a violation of the first amendment of the constitution. Ultimately, people act out of fear and from a false definition of nationalism in which people use it as a way to feel connected to the state and to its contributions to society. This arrogance that is created causes people to individualize American society as well as imagine they own a part of American culture, only to demonize beliefs that do not match up with their own (i.e. healthcare, welfare, marriage rights). This lays true when people disagree with state use of funds as they argue, “well I pay for that (or them) with my taxes”, therefore I should have a say in every expenditure that is possible. Again, an ‘us versus them’ mentality is shown as people use nationalism to further the majority 's

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