Globalization And Resistance Analysis

Decent Essays
1-Nigel C. Gibson. "Africa and globalization: marginalization and resistance"Journal of Asian and African Studies. Sage Publication, 2004.
This article examines the effects of globalization and capitalism on African political and socioeconomic development in our modern times. The article argues that globalization marginalized the African societies because of lack of investment and real opportunities. It destroyed the African traditional economies. The author also highlights the discriminatory policies of the World Bank 's structural adjustment of the 1980s. While globalization is the dominant economic culture today, it did not benefit Africa and the poor populations of the world. In many cases globalization made it worse because of the demands
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This article critiques the new African cultural identity that has emerged after the cold war in 1989. Eze argues that Afropolitanist identity is a constructed by the people of the African Diasporas. As indicated in the article, Antjie Krog of South African who was of European descent claimed to be an African in her poem. She tried to reconstruct her own identity to fit in with African majority in the country. Africans also are now re-examining their identity and morality of the always changing private life. Afropolitanism is allowing the African Diasporas to rethink about their identity and roots in this globalized world. Afropolitainsm, which part of cosmopolitanism takes long developmental process, because of the global cultural …show more content…
The African diasporas are experiencing a transformation of their personal development in the West. The African people who are born and raised in the West, find themselves in a multicultural and Multilanguage world. Their world view became different from those who are born and raised in Africa because they informed to mainly one culture. Selasi used her personal experiences with multiculturalism to find her exact identity. She explained the process of forming the African Diasporas identity throughout her novel. The article concludes that the process of developing identity has three dimensions which are racial, cultural and national. The African youth abroad may be an Afropolitan, but they have a strong bond with homeland

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