2001 Space Odyssey Film Analysis

Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece 2001: A Space Odyssey is a tour de force of filmmaking, and unquestionably, one of the all-time best science fiction films ever made. Kubrick takes the audiences from the dawn of mankind to the farthest region of outer space, he skillfully orchestrates every scene for us to ponder on, to question, to fathom, with meticulous and yet, casual detail that explodes visually upon our senses by the sheer scope of imagery. Critics and audiences, past and present, considered this to be one of Kubrick best films, and without a doubt, it is one of the most mind-binding film ever created. There is no other film quite like this and no film has come close to its grandeur in cinematography and wonderment of our very existence. …show more content…
Bowman stumbles upon a prerecorded message for the Discovery crew once they reached Jupiter space. The video image of Dr. Heywood Floyd explains that only HAL knew about their true mission to Jupiter, the discovery of the ancient monolith on the Moon, and its radio emission aimed at Jupiter prompted this secret mission. Dr. Bowman continues on to Jupiter alone, once there he discovers orbiting between Io and Jupiter, a dark, vertical slab, identical to the Tycho monolith, except this one is nearly 2 kilometers long. Dr. Bowman decides to investigate closer by piloting an EVA pod out to examine the gigantic monolith. But as he gets nearer, Dr. Bowman’s pod is sucked into the monolith‘s opaque interior, which is actually a massive Star …show more content…
Its special effects still convince, its innovative use of classical music still impresses, and the breath of its imagination and its extraordinary ambition are, if anything, even more evident now than they were at the film’s original release when, like many experimental works, it was widely misunderstood” (Schneider 137). Many critics and audiences in 1968 felt a bit cheated by the plot and lack of characterization. However, that was not the point of the film to begin with; it was something much bigger and bolder Kubrick was trying to express. “The fascinating thing about this film is that it fails on the human level but succeeds magnificently on a cosmic scale“ (Ebert,

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