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6 Cards in this Set

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What is raw data?

The listing of all the values (in the data set).

What should we do if data too big to view in its raw form?

Use case 1: Frequency Table as shown here: 

Use a Frequency Table as shown here:

What do relative/cumulative frequencies show?

Relative frequencies show that values frequency relative to other values, while Cumulative Frequencies add the frequencies up to that value. Example table is shown here: 

Relative frequencies show that values frequency relative to other values, while Cumulative Frequencies add the frequencies up to that value. Example table is shown here:

What two types of frequency tables are there? What are the differences?

The two types of frequency tables are: case 1 and case 2. The difference is that case 1 for many repeating values, while case 2 is for lack of repeating values (we group them in intervals instead).

What are two ways we can graphically represent our data?

Dot Plot (Which is nice and effective until large data is involved), and Histograms which work better with larger data. Here's what they look like: 

Dot Plot (Which is nice and effective until large data is involved), and Histograms which work better with larger data. Here's what they look like:

What are six things we look for in visually examining data? why do look at each one?

(1) Center
-> Indicates standard/average value
(2) Spread
->Indicates variability/diversity
(3) Symmetry vs Skewness
(4) Presence of extreme values/outliers
-> these can "throw off" future calculations
(5) Mode
->Most frequent value (must be frequ...

(1) Center


-> Indicates standard/average value


(2) Spread


->Indicates variability/diversity


(3) Symmetry vs Skewness


(4) Presence of extreme values/outliers


-> these can "throw off" future calculations


(5) Mode


->Most frequent value (must be frequent by significant amount)


->Bi-modal vs Uni-modal


(6) Specific Shapes


->Bell-curve, J-curve, Triangle, Convex, etc.