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POL 201 WEEK 2 COMPLETE (ASSIGNMENT – DQS AND QUIZ)

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http://www.coursehomework.com/product/pol-201-week-2-complete-assignment-dqs-and-quiz/






POL 201 WEEK 2 COMPLETE (ASSIGNMENT - DQS AND QUIZ)Week 2 DQ 1 Policy-making in the Federal System.The U.S. government's expansive role in public policy is caught in a swirl of conflicting cross-currents. On the one hand, popular expectations about government'sresponsibility to solve problems often exceed the capacity of state and local authorities to respond effectively. On the other hand, policies developed at the national level may not sufficiently reflect the great diversity of interests across the U.S. to be effective at the local level. Moreover, the search for effective policy is further complicated by theoretical debates about the constitutional framework of federalism, e.g., what limits on national power can be derived from the Tenth Amendment?A policy area in the middle of these cross-currents is elementary and secondary education – a subject traditionally under local control, with some oversight by the states. However, during the last four decades – especially since 2001 – the national government's role in education has grown significantly as a result of initiatives by Republican and Democratic administrations. Use the assigned resources to inform yourself about this role and the arguments of its supporters and critics.In your initial post of at least 200-250 words, briefly summarize the national government's education policies. Explain the main pros and cons in the debate about these policies. Evaluate them from two perspectives:a. The policies’ effectiveness in improving the quality of U.S. elementary and secondary education. (Justify your assessment by clearly explaining your definition of "effectiveness" and how it should be measured or determined.)b. Their consistency with the constitutional framework of federalism. (Justify your assessment by clearly explaining your interpretation of American federalism's constitutional framework and why federal education policies are or are not consistent with it.)Week 2 DQ 2 Meet Your Rep.The Constitution states, "The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States..." (Art. I, Sec. 2). Contrastthis with the original constitutional language for the other house of Congress, "The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof for six Years..." (Art. I, Sec. 3).The phrase "chosen by the Legislature" was changed to "elected by the people" by the 17th Amendment, but not until 1912. In other words, from the beginning the House of Representatives was intended to be exactly what its name suggests –representative of the people. (Note that in 2010 the Tea Party, and some Republican politicians, called for repeal of the 17th Amendment, eliminating the popular vote for Senators. While most Republican politicians have backed away from that view, many Tea Party chapters continue to demand its repeal.)Textbook models suggest how members of the House of Representatives may fulfill their constitutional duty to "represent" – the delegate model, the trustee model, the oversight model, and the service model. A weakness of these models is that they ignore the pervasive influence of interest groups, partisanship, and political money (campaign contributions) on the behavior of congressional reps. To what extent do these factors interfere with effective representation? First, get to know your rep in the U.S. House of Representatives, using the websites listed in the required resources for this discussion.Then, in your initial post of at least 200-250 words, identify an important issue related to your representative's committee or subcommittee work in Congress. Summarize your representative's position on that issue as described on his or her website or illustrated by legislation sponsored by your representative. Be concrete and specific, avoiding vague generalities like "my representative is for jobs" or "my representative is for national security." With respect to this issue, evaluate your representative's performance as a representative of the people in your legislative district. Justify your assessment from two perspectives:a. How well does your representative's position reflect your district's likely preferences or broad interests on the issue? Support your inferences about the district with facts – not just your opinion about the district as shaped by your own political opinions and ideology.b. Is there any evidence that may raise questions about whether interest groups, political party loyalty, or campaign money may influence your representative in ways that weaken his or her effectiveness as a true "representative" of the district? (Put on your critical thinking cap to respond to this aspect of the question.)Week 2 QuizIn Cooperative Federalism,States and localities might prefer block grants to categorical grants becauseContemporary federalism is characterized byGeneral Revenue Sharing offers states and localities even greater flexibility than block grants because theyUnfunded mandates are similar to Creative Federalism in thatThe division of Congress into committees allows for all exceptAn earmark isDuring a hearing, executive branch officials are asked toUnder the “necessary and proper” clause, Congress mayThe basis for congressional regulatory authority lies in Congress’Week 2 AssaignmentTHE TRUTH OF “OBAMACARE”AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT/ POL201THE TRUTH OF “OBAMACARE”AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT/ POL201THE TRUTH OF “OBAMACARE”Obama Care is the unofficial name for The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act which was signed into law on March 23, 2010. In a more general sense Obama Care and The Health Care for America Plan or any such name is a reference to the ongoing health care reform under President Obama.(http://obamacarefacts.com/whatis-obamacare.php) The ACA is landmark legislation designed to increase access to health care coverage for millions of Americans.(Wizemann,2011) This legislation represents one of the largest and most comprehensive reforms to the American health care system since the enactment of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. The ACA seeks to extend coverage to roughly 50 million uninsured Americans, slowing down the growth in the cost of health care, and improving the quality of care health care by changing the delivery system.(Some people who oppose the Act are concerned that it gives the Federal government too much control over personal health care decisions and benefits, forcing a complex one-size-fits-all health system onto the states. Some people who are in favor of the Act want lower health care costs overall by making it affordable for more people.The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 significantly changed health care in the U.S., making insurance available to 32 million more Americans -- a total of 95% of the legal population. The Act, is being phased in over four years. By 2014, every citizen will be required to have health insurance, or face a penalty. However, they can choose how to get coverage. If they already have a plan, either through their employers, Medicaid, Medicare, or privately, they can keep it. Those who can't currently get health insurance will have additional options. They can purchase it from a state-based health insurance exchange (and possibly get subsidy) or they may be eligible under expanded Medicare guidelines.The program is originally designed to add to the federal budget $930 billion dollars. The act was designed to offset the budget by lowering payments to hospitals, Increasing Medicare taxes on higher income households, assessing penalties on employers who don't offer, and individuals who don't take, health care insurance, assessing taxes on various health related activities, and reducing overhead by consolidating the higher education loan program with the Pell Grant program.Although there has been tremendous opposition before, during and after its becoming law. The Supreme Court ruled it was constitutional that all U.S. citizens must purchase health care insurance from a private carrier, or pay a penalty, is for the right for congress to impose a tax. Even with our house of representatives trying numerous time to repeal the law ti still keeps getting over ruled. The opposition has been so great that many Americans think the law has already been repealed. I am sure you are asking yourself what does this mean, when does this come to affect and how does this affect you?Here are the changes that happened in 2010. Medicare beneficiaries who fell into the Medicare Part D Prescription Drug "donut hole" received a $250 rebate. They received a 50% discount on brand name drugs in 2011, and the doughnut hole is eliminated in 2020. Children were allowed to stay on their parents' health insurance until they turn 26. New private plans were required to cover preventive services with no co-payments, and they are exempt from deductibles. Consumers who applied to new plans have access to an external appeals process if coverage is denied. Insurance companies were prohibited from dropping coverage if someone got really sick. They couldn't create lifetime coverage limits. They could no longer deny coverage to children with pre-existing conditions. The same will apply to adults in 2014. Until then, adults with pre-existing conditions who have been denied coverage will get access to temporary health insurance coverage until the exchanges are set up.These are the changes that happened in 2011Medicare-covered preventative services were exempted from deductibles and the co-pay was eliminated. Insurance companies must prove they spent at least 80% of the premium payments on medical services, rather than on things like advertising and executive salaries. Those that didn't were required to provide rebates to policyholders. States were funded to require health insurance companies to submit justification for all rate hikes. Funds were expanded to increase the number of doctors and nurses, and more community health centers -- enough to double the number of patients they can treat in the next five years.These are future changes to look forward to. Medical expenses must be at least 10% of income before they are deductible for those under 65. Manufacturers and importers of medical devices will pay a 2.3% excise tax. Federal funds will increase to allow Medicaid to offer free preventive services, and to extend CHIP for an additional two years. The Federal government will fund states to pay primary care physicians 100% of the Medicare fee. Medicare will start a pilot program to encourage hospitals to bundle services before submitting for payment. Additional taxes will be paid by the 1 million people who make more than $200,000 and the 4 million couples filing jointly who make more than $250,000. Specifically, they would pay 3.8% Medicare taxes on dividends, capital gains, rent and royalties and 2.35% (up from 1.45%) Medicare taxes on income. In 2014, the state-run health exchanges will be set up. Medicaid eligibility will be expanded to include those with incomes up to 133% of the Federal poverty line ($29,000 for a family of four). New subsidies will become available for with incomes up to 400% of the poverty level ($88,000 for a family of four). Those who don't purchase insurance will be assessed penalties: 2014 - The greater of $95 or 1% of income. 2015 - $325 or 2% of income. 2016 - $695 or 2.5% of income. Businesses with 50+ workers must pay $2,000 per worker (except for the first 20) if they don’t offer health insurance. Those that do receive a tax credit of 50% of the premium cost. (Donmoyer, 2012 ) ReferencesWizemann, Theresa. Health Literacy Implications for Health Care Reform : Workshop Summary.Washington, DC, USA: National Academies Press, 2011. p 5.http://site.ebrary.com/lib/ashford/Doc?id=10488622&ppg=19Copyright © 2011. National Academies Press. All rights reserved.http://obamacarefacts.com/whatis-obamacare.php THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT TURNS TWO,LEE GOLDBERG, SABIHA ZAINULBHAI,HTTP://WWW.NASI.ORG/DISCUSS/2012/03/AFFORDABLE-CARE-ACT-TURNS-TWO?GCLID=CLOUYV-9VRICFURXQGOD3TWALA MARCH 2012HealthReform.gov, Ryan Donmoyer, "New Health Care Taxes," Bloomberg, March 22, 2010) Article updated July 13, 2012 COURSES CATEGORIESACA1 WGUACCACC 205ACC 290ACC 291ACC 400ACC 403ACC 410ACC 410ACC 422ACC 460ACC 497ACC 555ACC 557ACC 560ACC 560ACC 561ACC 564ACC 565ACCTACCT 212ACCT 344ACCT 346ACCT 504ACCT 553ARTART 101Ashford BUS 401ASHFORD BUS 640Ashford HIS 204ASHFORD MAT 222BA 215BA 225BA 260BA 265BA 340BA 350BA 370BA 405BA 470BIS 155BIS 220BSOP 429BSOP 434BUSBUS 230BUS 250BUS 303BUS 311BUS 330BUS 401BUS 401BUS 402BUS 405BUS 409BUS 430BUS 475BUS 490BUS 497BUS 499BUS 499BUS 508BUS 518BUS 520BUS 599BUS 620BUS 640BUSN 115BUSN 319CISCIS 106CIS 210CIS 246CIS 312CIS 321CIS 417CJA 484CMGT 410Complete CoursesCPN1 WGUDBM 380ECE 101ECE 201ECE 203ECE 315ECO 204ECO 365ECO 372Eco 550ECO 561ECOM 210ECON 312ENGL 112ENGL 230ESE 315FIN 515FIN 571HCA 240HIS 204HIS 415HIST 410HIST 415HLT 362HOSP 310HRM 300HRM 326HRM 420HRM 531HRM 586HRM 587HSM 340HSM 541LAS 432LAW 531LAWS 310LDR 300LRD 300MA 312

POL 201 WEEK 2 COMPLETE (ASSIGNMENT – DQS AND QUIZ)

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http://www.coursehomework.com/product/pol-201-week-2-complete-assignment-dqs-and-quiz/






POL 201 WEEK 2 COMPLETE (ASSIGNMENT - DQS AND QUIZ)Week 2 DQ 1 Policy-making in the Federal System.The U.S. government's expansive role in public policy is caught in a swirl of conflicting cross-currents. On the one hand, popular expectations about government'sresponsibility to solve problems often exceed the capacity of state and local authorities to respond effectively. On the other hand, policies developed at the national level may not sufficiently reflect the great diversity of interests across the U.S. to be effective at the local level. Moreover, the search for effective policy is further complicated by theoretical debates about the constitutional framework of federalism, e.g., what limits on national power can be derived from the Tenth Amendment?A policy area in the middle of these cross-currents is elementary and secondary education – a subject traditionally under local control, with some oversight by the states. However, during the last four decades – especially since 2001 – the national government's role in education has grown significantly as a result of initiatives by Republican and Democratic administrations. Use the assigned resources to inform yourself about this role and the arguments of its supporters and critics.In your initial post of at least 200-250 words, briefly summarize the national government's education policies. Explain the main pros and cons in the debate about these policies. Evaluate them from two perspectives:a. The policies’ effectiveness in improving the quality of U.S. elementary and secondary education. (Justify your assessment by clearly explaining your definition of "effectiveness" and how it should be measured or determined.)b. Their consistency with the constitutional framework of federalism. (Justify your assessment by clearly explaining your interpretation of American federalism's constitutional framework and why federal education policies are or are not consistent with it.)Week 2 DQ 2 Meet Your Rep.The Constitution states, "The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States..." (Art. I, Sec. 2). Contrastthis with the original constitutional language for the other house of Congress, "The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof for six Years..." (Art. I, Sec. 3).The phrase "chosen by the Legislature" was changed to "elected by the people" by the 17th Amendment, but not until 1912. In other words, from the beginning the House of Representatives was intended to be exactly what its name suggests –representative of the people. (Note that in 2010 the Tea Party, and some Republican politicians, called for repeal of the 17th Amendment, eliminating the popular vote for Senators. While most Republican politicians have backed away from that view, many Tea Party chapters continue to demand its repeal.)Textbook models suggest how members of the House of Representatives may fulfill their constitutional duty to "represent" – the delegate model, the trustee model, the oversight model, and the service model. A weakness of these models is that they ignore the pervasive influence of interest groups, partisanship, and political money (campaign contributions) on the behavior of congressional reps. To what extent do these factors interfere with effective representation? First, get to know your rep in the U.S. House of Representatives, using the websites listed in the required resources for this discussion.Then, in your initial post of at least 200-250 words, identify an important issue related to your representative's committee or subcommittee work in Congress. Summarize your representative's position on that issue as described on his or her website or illustrated by legislation sponsored by your representative. Be concrete and specific, avoiding vague generalities like "my representative is for jobs" or "my representative is for national security." With respect to this issue, evaluate your representative's performance as a representative of the people in your legislative district. Justify your assessment from two perspectives:a. How well does your representative's position reflect your district's likely preferences or broad interests on the issue? Support your inferences about the district with facts – not just your opinion about the district as shaped by your own political opinions and ideology.b. Is there any evidence that may raise questions about whether interest groups, political party loyalty, or campaign money may influence your representative in ways that weaken his or her effectiveness as a true "representative" of the district? (Put on your critical thinking cap to respond to this aspect of the question.)Week 2 QuizIn Cooperative Federalism,States and localities might prefer block grants to categorical grants becauseContemporary federalism is characterized byGeneral Revenue Sharing offers states and localities even greater flexibility than block grants because theyUnfunded mandates are similar to Creative Federalism in thatThe division of Congress into committees allows for all exceptAn earmark isDuring a hearing, executive branch officials are asked toUnder the “necessary and proper” clause, Congress mayThe basis for congressional regulatory authority lies in Congress’Week 2 AssaignmentTHE TRUTH OF “OBAMACARE”AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT/ POL201THE TRUTH OF “OBAMACARE”AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT/ POL201THE TRUTH OF “OBAMACARE”Obama Care is the unofficial name for The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act which was signed into law on March 23, 2010. In a more general sense Obama Care and The Health Care for America Plan or any such name is a reference to the ongoing health care reform under President Obama.(http://obamacarefacts.com/whatis-obamacare.php) The ACA is landmark legislation designed to increase access to health care coverage for millions of Americans.(Wizemann,2011) This legislation represents one of the largest and most comprehensive reforms to the American health care system since the enactment of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. The ACA seeks to extend coverage to roughly 50 million uninsured Americans, slowing down the growth in the cost of health care, and improving the quality of care health care by changing the delivery system.(Some people who oppose the Act are concerned that it gives the Federal government too much control over personal health care decisions and benefits, forcing a complex one-size-fits-all health system onto the states. Some people who are in favor of the Act want lower health care costs overall by making it affordable for more people.The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 significantly changed health care in the U.S., making insurance available to 32 million more Americans -- a total of 95% of the legal population. The Act, is being phased in over four years. By 2014, every citizen will be required to have health insurance, or face a penalty. However, they can choose how to get coverage. If they already have a plan, either through their employers, Medicaid, Medicare, or privately, they can keep it. Those who can't currently get health insurance will have additional options. They can purchase it from a state-based health insurance exchange (and possibly get subsidy) or they may be eligible under expanded Medicare guidelines.The program is originally designed to add to the federal budget $930 billion dollars. The act was designed to offset the budget by lowering payments to hospitals, Increasing Medicare taxes on higher income households, assessing penalties on employers who don't offer, and individuals who don't take, health care insurance, assessing taxes on various health related activities, and reducing overhead by consolidating the higher education loan program with the Pell Grant program.Although there has been tremendous opposition before, during and after its becoming law. The Supreme Court ruled it was constitutional that all U.S. citizens must purchase health care insurance from a private carrier, or pay a penalty, is for the right for congress to impose a tax. Even with our house of representatives trying numerous time to repeal the law ti still keeps getting over ruled. The opposition has been so great that many Americans think the law has already been repealed. I am sure you are asking yourself what does this mean, when does this come to affect and how does this affect you?Here are the changes that happened in 2010. Medicare beneficiaries who fell into the Medicare Part D Prescription Drug "donut hole" received a $250 rebate. They received a 50% discount on brand name drugs in 2011, and the doughnut hole is eliminated in 2020. Children were allowed to stay on their parents' health insurance until they turn 26. New private plans were required to cover preventive services with no co-payments, and they are exempt from deductibles. Consumers who applied to new plans have access to an external appeals process if coverage is denied. Insurance companies were prohibited from dropping coverage if someone got really sick. They couldn't create lifetime coverage limits. They could no longer deny coverage to children with pre-existing conditions. The same will apply to adults in 2014. Until then, adults with pre-existing conditions who have been denied coverage will get access to temporary health insurance coverage until the exchanges are set up.These are the changes that happened in 2011Medicare-covered preventative services were exempted from deductibles and the co-pay was eliminated. Insurance companies must prove they spent at least 80% of the premium payments on medical services, rather than on things like advertising and executive salaries. Those that didn't were required to provide rebates to policyholders. States were funded to require health insurance companies to submit justification for all rate hikes. Funds were expanded to increase the number of doctors and nurses, and more community health centers -- enough to double the number of patients they can treat in the next five years.These are future changes to look forward to. Medical expenses must be at least 10% of income before they are deductible for those under 65. Manufacturers and importers of medical devices will pay a 2.3% excise tax. Federal funds will increase to allow Medicaid to offer free preventive services, and to extend CHIP for an additional two years. The Federal government will fund states to pay primary care physicians 100% of the Medicare fee. Medicare will start a pilot program to encourage hospitals to bundle services before submitting for payment. Additional taxes will be paid by the 1 million people who make more than $200,000 and the 4 million couples filing jointly who make more than $250,000. Specifically, they would pay 3.8% Medicare taxes on dividends, capital gains, rent and royalties and 2.35% (up from 1.45%) Medicare taxes on income. In 2014, the state-run health exchanges will be set up. Medicaid eligibility will be expanded to include those with incomes up to 133% of the Federal poverty line ($29,000 for a family of four). New subsidies will become available for with incomes up to 400% of the poverty level ($88,000 for a family of four). Those who don't purchase insurance will be assessed penalties: 2014 - The greater of $95 or 1% of income. 2015 - $325 or 2% of income. 2016 - $695 or 2.5% of income. Businesses with 50+ workers must pay $2,000 per worker (except for the first 20) if they don’t offer health insurance. Those that do receive a tax credit of 50% of the premium cost. (Donmoyer, 2012 ) ReferencesWizemann, Theresa. Health Literacy Implications for Health Care Reform : Workshop Summary.Washington, DC, USA: National Academies Press, 2011. p 5.http://site.ebrary.com/lib/ashford/Doc?id=10488622&ppg=19Copyright © 2011. National Academies Press. All rights reserved.http://obamacarefacts.com/whatis-obamacare.php THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT TURNS TWO,LEE GOLDBERG, SABIHA ZAINULBHAI,HTTP://WWW.NASI.ORG/DISCUSS/2012/03/AFFORDABLE-CARE-ACT-TURNS-TWO?GCLID=CLOUYV-9VRICFURXQGOD3TWALA MARCH 2012HealthReform.gov, Ryan Donmoyer, "New Health Care Taxes," Bloomberg, March 22, 2010) Article updated July 13, 2012 COURSES CATEGORIESACA1 WGUACCACC 205ACC 290ACC 291ACC 400ACC 403ACC 410ACC 410ACC 422ACC 460ACC 497ACC 555ACC 557ACC 560ACC 560ACC 561ACC 564ACC 565ACCTACCT 212ACCT 344ACCT 346ACCT 504ACCT 553ARTART 101Ashford BUS 401ASHFORD BUS 640Ashford HIS 204ASHFORD MAT 222BA 215BA 225BA 260BA 265BA 340BA 350BA 370BA 405BA 470BIS 155BIS 220BSOP 429BSOP 434BUSBUS 230BUS 250BUS 303BUS 311BUS 330BUS 401BUS 401BUS 402BUS 405BUS 409BUS 430BUS 475BUS 490BUS 497BUS 499BUS 499BUS 508BUS 518BUS 520BUS 599BUS 620BUS 640BUSN 115BUSN 319CISCIS 106CIS 210CIS 246CIS 312CIS 321CIS 417CJA 484CMGT 410Complete CoursesCPN1 WGUDBM 380ECE 101ECE 201ECE 203ECE 315ECO 204ECO 365ECO 372Eco 550ECO 561ECOM 210ECON 312ENGL 112ENGL 230ESE 315FIN 515FIN 571HCA 240HIS 204HIS 415HIST 410HIST 415HLT 362HOSP 310HRM 300HRM 326HRM 420HRM 531HRM 586HRM 587HSM 340HSM 541LAS 432LAW 531LAWS 310LDR 300LRD 300MA 312

POL 201 WEEK 2 COMPLETE (ASSIGNMENT – DQS AND QUIZ)

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http://www.coursehomework.com/product/pol-201-week-2-complete-assignment-dqs-and-quiz/






POL 201 WEEK 2 COMPLETE (ASSIGNMENT - DQS AND QUIZ)Week 2 DQ 1 Policy-making in the Federal System.The U.S. government's expansive role in public policy is caught in a swirl of conflicting cross-currents. On the one hand, popular expectations about government'sresponsibility to solve problems often exceed the capacity of state and local authorities to respond effectively. On the other hand, policies developed at the national level may not sufficiently reflect the great diversity of interests across the U.S. to be effective at the local level. Moreover, the search for effective policy is further complicated by theoretical debates about the constitutional framework of federalism, e.g., what limits on national power can be derived from the Tenth Amendment?A policy area in the middle of these cross-currents is elementary and secondary education – a subject traditionally under local control, with some oversight by the states. However, during the last four decades – especially since 2001 – the national government's role in education has grown significantly as a result of initiatives by Republican and Democratic administrations. Use the assigned resources to inform yourself about this role and the arguments of its supporters and critics.In your initial post of at least 200-250 words, briefly summarize the national government's education policies. Explain the main pros and cons in the debate about these policies. Evaluate them from two perspectives:a. The policies’ effectiveness in improving the quality of U.S. elementary and secondary education. (Justify your assessment by clearly explaining your definition of "effectiveness" and how it should be measured or determined.)b. Their consistency with the constitutional framework of federalism. (Justify your assessment by clearly explaining your interpretation of American federalism's constitutional framework and why federal education policies are or are not consistent with it.)Week 2 DQ 2 Meet Your Rep.The Constitution states, "The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States..." (Art. I, Sec. 2). Contrastthis with the original constitutional language for the other house of Congress, "The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State, chosen by the Legislature thereof for six Years..." (Art. I, Sec. 3).The phrase "chosen by the Legislature" was changed to "elected by the people" by the 17th Amendment, but not until 1912. In other words, from the beginning the House of Representatives was intended to be exactly what its name suggests –representative of the people. (Note that in 2010 the Tea Party, and some Republican politicians, called for repeal of the 17th Amendment, eliminating the popular vote for Senators. While most Republican politicians have backed away from that view, many Tea Party chapters continue to demand its repeal.)Textbook models suggest how members of the House of Representatives may fulfill their constitutional duty to "represent" – the delegate model, the trustee model, the oversight model, and the service model. A weakness of these models is that they ignore the pervasive influence of interest groups, partisanship, and political money (campaign contributions) on the behavior of congressional reps. To what extent do these factors interfere with effective representation? First, get to know your rep in the U.S. House of Representatives, using the websites listed in the required resources for this discussion.Then, in your initial post of at least 200-250 words, identify an important issue related to your representative's committee or subcommittee work in Congress. Summarize your representative's position on that issue as described on his or her website or illustrated by legislation sponsored by your representative. Be concrete and specific, avoiding vague generalities like "my representative is for jobs" or "my representative is for national security." With respect to this issue, evaluate your representative's performance as a representative of the people in your legislative district. Justify your assessment from two perspectives:a. How well does your representative's position reflect your district's likely preferences or broad interests on the issue? Support your inferences about the district with facts – not just your opinion about the district as shaped by your own political opinions and ideology.b. Is there any evidence that may raise questions about whether interest groups, political party loyalty, or campaign money may influence your representative in ways that weaken his or her effectiveness as a true "representative" of the district? (Put on your critical thinking cap to respond to this aspect of the question.)Week 2 QuizIn Cooperative Federalism,States and localities might prefer block grants to categorical grants becauseContemporary federalism is characterized byGeneral Revenue Sharing offers states and localities even greater flexibility than block grants because theyUnfunded mandates are similar to Creative Federalism in thatThe division of Congress into committees allows for all exceptAn earmark isDuring a hearing, executive branch officials are asked toUnder the “necessary and proper” clause, Congress mayThe basis for congressional regulatory authority lies in Congress’Week 2 AssaignmentTHE TRUTH OF “OBAMACARE”AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT/ POL201THE TRUTH OF “OBAMACARE”AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT/ POL201THE TRUTH OF “OBAMACARE”Obama Care is the unofficial name for The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act which was signed into law on March 23, 2010. In a more general sense Obama Care and The Health Care for America Plan or any such name is a reference to the ongoing health care reform under President Obama.(http://obamacarefacts.com/whatis-obamacare.php) The ACA is landmark legislation designed to increase access to health care coverage for millions of Americans.(Wizemann,2011) This legislation represents one of the largest and most comprehensive reforms to the American health care system since the enactment of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. The ACA seeks to extend coverage to roughly 50 million uninsured Americans, slowing down the growth in the cost of health care, and improving the quality of care health care by changing the delivery system.(Some people who oppose the Act are concerned that it gives the Federal government too much control over personal health care decisions and benefits, forcing a complex one-size-fits-all health system onto the states. Some people who are in favor of the Act want lower health care costs overall by making it affordable for more people.The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 significantly changed health care in the U.S., making insurance available to 32 million more Americans -- a total of 95% of the legal population. The Act, is being phased in over four years. By 2014, every citizen will be required to have health insurance, or face a penalty. However, they can choose how to get coverage. If they already have a plan, either through their employers, Medicaid, Medicare, or privately, they can keep it. Those who can't currently get health insurance will have additional options. They can purchase it from a state-based health insurance exchange (and possibly get subsidy) or they may be eligible under expanded Medicare guidelines.The program is originally designed to add to the federal budget $930 billion dollars. The act was designed to offset the budget by lowering payments to hospitals, Increasing Medicare taxes on higher income households, assessing penalties on employers who don't offer, and individuals who don't take, health care insurance, assessing taxes on various health related activities, and reducing overhead by consolidating the higher education loan program with the Pell Grant program.Although there has been tremendous opposition before, during and after its becoming law. The Supreme Court ruled it was constitutional that all U.S. citizens must purchase health care insurance from a private carrier, or pay a penalty, is for the right for congress to impose a tax. Even with our house of representatives trying numerous time to repeal the law ti still keeps getting over ruled. The opposition has been so great that many Americans think the law has already been repealed. I am sure you are asking yourself what does this mean, when does this come to affect and how does this affect you?Here are the changes that happened in 2010. Medicare beneficiaries who fell into the Medicare Part D Prescription Drug "donut hole" received a $250 rebate. They received a 50% discount on brand name drugs in 2011, and the doughnut hole is eliminated in 2020. Children were allowed to stay on their parents' health insurance until they turn 26. New private plans were required to cover preventive services with no co-payments, and they are exempt from deductibles. Consumers who applied to new plans have access to an external appeals process if coverage is denied. Insurance companies were prohibited from dropping coverage if someone got really sick. They couldn't create lifetime coverage limits. They could no longer deny coverage to children with pre-existing conditions. The same will apply to adults in 2014. Until then, adults with pre-existing conditions who have been denied coverage will get access to temporary health insurance coverage until the exchanges are set up.These are the changes that happened in 2011Medicare-covered preventative services were exempted from deductibles and the co-pay was eliminated. Insurance companies must prove they spent at least 80% of the premium payments on medical services, rather than on things like advertising and executive salaries. Those that didn't were required to provide rebates to policyholders. States were funded to require health insurance companies to submit justification for all rate hikes. Funds were expanded to increase the number of doctors and nurses, and more community health centers -- enough to double the number of patients they can treat in the next five years.These are future changes to look forward to. Medical expenses must be at least 10% of income before they are deductible for those under 65. Manufacturers and importers of medical devices will pay a 2.3% excise tax. Federal funds will increase to allow Medicaid to offer free preventive services, and to extend CHIP for an additional two years. The Federal government will fund states to pay primary care physicians 100% of the Medicare fee. Medicare will start a pilot program to encourage hospitals to bundle services before submitting for payment. Additional taxes will be paid by the 1 million people who make more than $200,000 and the 4 million couples filing jointly who make more than $250,000. Specifically, they would pay 3.8% Medicare taxes on dividends, capital gains, rent and royalties and 2.35% (up from 1.45%) Medicare taxes on income. In 2014, the state-run health exchanges will be set up. Medicaid eligibility will be expanded to include those with incomes up to 133% of the Federal poverty line ($29,000 for a family of four). New subsidies will become available for with incomes up to 400% of the poverty level ($88,000 for a family of four). Those who don't purchase insurance will be assessed penalties: 2014 - The greater of $95 or 1% of income. 2015 - $325 or 2% of income. 2016 - $695 or 2.5% of income. Businesses with 50+ workers must pay $2,000 per worker (except for the first 20) if they don’t offer health insurance. Those that do receive a tax credit of 50% of the premium cost. (Donmoyer, 2012 ) ReferencesWizemann, Theresa. Health Literacy Implications for Health Care Reform : Workshop Summary.Washington, DC, USA: National Academies Press, 2011. p 5.http://site.ebrary.com/lib/ashford/Doc?id=10488622&ppg=19Copyright © 2011. National Academies Press. All rights reserved.http://obamacarefacts.com/whatis-obamacare.php THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT TURNS TWO,LEE GOLDBERG, SABIHA ZAINULBHAI,HTTP://WWW.NASI.ORG/DISCUSS/2012/03/AFFORDABLE-CARE-ACT-TURNS-TWO?GCLID=CLOUYV-9VRICFURXQGOD3TWALA MARCH 2012HealthReform.gov, Ryan Donmoyer, "New Health Care Taxes," Bloomberg, March 22, 2010) Article updated July 13, 2012 COURSES CATEGORIESACA1 WGUACCACC 205ACC 290ACC 291ACC 400ACC 403ACC 410ACC 410ACC 422ACC 460ACC 497ACC 555ACC 557ACC 560ACC 560ACC 561ACC 564ACC 565ACCTACCT 212ACCT 344ACCT 346ACCT 504ACCT 553ARTART 101Ashford BUS 401ASHFORD BUS 640Ashford HIS 204ASHFORD MAT 222BA 215BA 225BA 260BA 265BA 340BA 350BA 370BA 405BA 470BIS 155BIS 220BSOP 429BSOP 434BUSBUS 230BUS 250BUS 303BUS 311BUS 330BUS 401BUS 401BUS 402BUS 405BUS 409BUS 430BUS 475BUS 490BUS 497BUS 499BUS 499BUS 508BUS 518BUS 520BUS 599BUS 620BUS 640BUSN 115BUSN 319CISCIS 106CIS 210CIS 246CIS 312CIS 321CIS 417CJA 484CMGT 410Complete CoursesCPN1 WGUDBM 380ECE 101ECE 201ECE 203ECE 315ECO 204ECO 365ECO 372Eco 550ECO 561ECOM 210ECON 312ENGL 112ENGL 230ESE 315FIN 515FIN 571HCA 240HIS 204HIS 415HIST 410HIST 415HLT 362HOSP 310HRM 300HRM 326HRM 420HRM 531HRM 586HRM 587HSM 340HSM 541LAS 432LAW 531LAWS 310LDR 300LRD 300MA 312