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15 Cards in this Set

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James Madison

March 16,1751 to June 29, 1836. James Madison, Jr. was an American statesman, political theorist, and the fourth President of the United States.

Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton was a founding father of the United States, chief staff aide to General George Washington, one of the most influential interpreters and promoters of the U.S. Constitution. United States statesman and leader of the Federalists; as the first Secretary of the Treasury he establish a federal bank; was mortally wounded in a duel with Aaron Burr (1755-1804)

Framers of the Constitution

The "Founding Fathers" included two major groups. The Signers of the Declaration of Independence signed the United States Declaration of Independence in 1776. The Framers of the Constitution were delegates to the Constitutional Convention and helped draft the Constitution of the United States

Federalist

The Federalist Party, informally called Pro-Administration Party until 1792, was the first American political party. It existed from the early 1790s to 1816 (the era of the First Party System); its remnants lasted into the 1820s. The Federalists controlled the federal government until 1801.

Anti-Federalist

A person who opposed the ratification of the Constitution in 1789 and thereafter allied with Thomas Jefferson's Antifederal Party, which opposed extension of the powers of the federal Government

Bill of Rights

In the United States, the Bill of Rights is the first ten amendments to the Constitution. The purpose of the Bill of Rights is to provide specific freedoms to citizens and limit the power of the government.

The Federalist Papers

A collection of 85 articles and essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay promoting the ratification of the United States Constitution.

Alien and Sedition Acts

The Alien and Sedition Acts were four bills that were passed by the Federalists in the 5th United States Congress and signed into law by President John Adams in 1798, the result of the French Revolution and during an undeclared naval war with France, later known as the Quasi-War.

Annapolis Convention

The Annapolis Convention, formally titled as a Meeting of Commissioners to Remedy Defects of the Federal Government was a national political convention held September 11–14, 1786 at Mann's Tavern in Annapolis, Maryland.

Constitutional Convention

A constitutional convention is a gathering for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. A general constitutional convention is called to create the first constitution of a political unit or to entirely replace an existing constitution.

Virginia Plan

The Virginia Plan was a proposal by Virginia delegates for a bicameral legislative branch. The plan was drafted by James Madison while he waited for a quorum to assemble at the Constitutional Convention of 1787.

New Jersey Plan

The New Jersey Plan was a proposal for the structure of the United States Government presented by William Paterson at the Constitutional Convention on June 15, 1787.

Connecticut/Great Comprimise

Roger Sherman addressed the nettlesome issues of representation and slavery by offering what came to be known as the Connecticut Compromise (or Great Compromise). It provided: The upper house (Senate) would have equal representation and be elected by the lower house.

French Revolution

An uprising in France against the monarchy from 1789 to 1799 which resulted in the establishment of France as a republic. An example of the French Revolution is the storming of the Bastille by the French citizens. Influenced by the colonists against British Rule

Whiskey Rebellion

The Whiskey Rebellion, also known as the Whiskey Insurrection, was a tax protest in the United States beginning in 1791, during the presidency of George Washington.