Lucy Stone Women's Suffrage

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While the men between 1776 and 1861 wanted to avoid getting the women the right to vote, women fought long and hard until they proved to everyone that they achieved what they always have wanted. During this time period, women were looked down upon and were able to do only the bare minimum. Women such as Lucretia Mott, the Grimke sisters, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, and Abigail Adams became advocates of women getting the vote. Adams wrote so many letters to her husband, John Adams, explaining and trying to get him to understand why women getting the vote was so important. I think that women made a significant progress for women 's suffrage because women made it possible for multiple voting. There are now twice as many …show more content…
She knew women carried a heavy load on their shoulders from doing all the household chores, to cooking, and taking care of the children. Lucy Stone was very admirable and since the age of twelve, she has always been independent. By that I mean she had a job, and she taught herself education she needed to know. “She was one of the earliest women to graduate from the “regular,” as distinguished from the “literacy,” course at Oberlin in 847, having deliberately prepared herself for a career as a public speaker on the behalf of the oppressed: “I expect to plead not for the slave only. But for the suffering humanity everywhere. ESPECIALLY DO I MEAN TO LABOR FOR THE ELEVATION OF MY SEX.” (Flexner, 64) This tells you a lot about Stone. She was hardworking from the time she was young until she got older. Stone was forced, clear of her words, had courage, and made sure she would win over everyone when she was done speaking. Lucy Stone educated herself and I think that shows a lot about who she is and how she was an important advocate on women getting the vote. Although at some her of darkest times when no one believed she could possibly win over everyone. But in the end, “her husband, herself and her daughter won everyone over after they covered the …show more content…
Mott became a teacher in her early teens which she believed that women could achieve more than men could. She was extremely educated by the time she was young. At the age of 28, Lucretia Mott became a public speaker. Mott traveled everyone talking to thousands of people on why women should get the vote. She was a huge public icon and very appreciated by her peers. She was also the first woman to become a founder of the Anti-Slavery Society. “Her contribution in helping free the gifted and eager mind of Elizabeth Cady Stanton was an invaluable one, for the younger woman was destine to be the leading intellectual force in the emancipation of American women.” (Flexner, 67) Cady also believed, like Mott did, that women could achieve more than men. Cady grew up in Albany and spent a lot of her time in her father’s office. She was a bright young children who would listen to her dad’s clients talk about legal issues. Her dad was a judge and that where she got most of her knowledge from. Stanton used her heart and soul to articulate the way she spoke. She knew it was difficult for mothers to to be torn against their children, along with the duties and responsibilities that came along with that job. She would often speak to crows for a half hour long. Those speeches would consist of Stanton talking about political rights for women and how there has been campaigns for

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