19th Century Women's Rights

Great Essays
Women 's right has been a very significant throughout history. Women have earned their right s through the women 's suffrage movement by writing the declaration of sentiments and having a law passed the gave them their right 's to vote, own property and have rights that men have by being able to work were they could. Women have been assigned different roles that they have to commit to were the men basically have all the authority and women have to follow the virtues of The Cult of Domesticity and basically not have the freedom to do what they really desire and have to follow those traditions of being the light of the household and follow their daily duties.
For the past years women have had many obligations in their life 's that weren 't subjected to men, they 've had fewer rights and less freedom than men. Women were considered much weaker than men although women started to get opportunities to receive education. Towards the end of the 19th century more women were involved in school in getting an education but in the women society they were only suppose to be in the Cult of Domesticity idea.
When women started taking part of movements and they had some sort of involvement in politics, they started to realize why they weren 't allowed to vote. It is said that in the early eras
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Work for the women didn 't involve anything than being at home cleaning and cooking and taking care of their children. Women had to obtain four virtues purity, submissiveness, pieity and domesticity. The women that endorsed these virtues were commonly white and Protestant and live in the northern colonies such as New England. The cult of domesticity women were considered the main person of the household. It was the idea of feminity, although all women were suppose to fall under this idea but women who were of color or were an immigrant were not considered true

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