Women's Role In Early American History

1052 Words 5 Pages
Women have always been vital when it comes to the role they play in American history. Women have held many different roles throughout history whether it is that of moving from their country to a new unknown land, to farming on their family farmland, to helping in the war effort. Their roles are ever-changing. Women have adapted in all areas of their life, from working together or complimentary with men during the time of the Native American (Evans8). Women quickly changed during the fur trade. They took charge and were the go-to person when the Europeans wanted to buy fur and sell they goods they brought over from Europe. Then went through an assimilation process forced on to them when the Spanish conquest came to what is now America. Forcing …show more content…
Women were considered free only when under the submission of their husbands (L2). Marriage was regarded as a contract and rarely did it involve love for each other at the beginning of the marriage (L2). Women did most of the work. Continuously working both in and outside of the home caring for the children while still having to perform their daily household duties. They, not only took care of the family but also were responsible for the increase in the population of early settlers with the children they bore resulting in the expansion of the early colonies. Women were especially vital to the survival of the family as producers of cloth; they spun yarn into the thread that was used to make clothing or linens (Evans23). Women would make the family's clothing as well. If they were in farms they were in charge of the livestock; they milked the cows, made butter, cheese, and any other items that could be sold as surplus to contribute to the economy of the family (Evans23). Women often took over the family business while the husbands were away. Widows often continued to run businesses after their spouses died (L3). Widows, although entitled to one-third of the land their husbands owned, were not allowed to sell it until the registry approved it (L3).Usually, the death of a spouse led to remarriage so that the widow would not be on the dole of the church(L3). Although women were not allowed to keep their …show more content…
The women's role no longer was seen as vital, caused a decline in the economic status of women. Women did not have first-hand access to the world of politics but greatly influenced their husbands. Women's roles within the family and church allowed them to influence the political system(L3). In the 1700s Evangelists ignited a religious revival which energized Protestants in the colonies. Farmers; women were especially active in the churches that were springing up everywhere. Although the women were rarely allowed to voice their opinion, they had a voice in church affairs and were especially active in close monitoring of the moral behavior of church members(L3). During the witch trials, most of the accused were middle aged women who were well off and without a father, husband or son who could protect her. When brought to trial they were judged by men (L3). The family behind most of the disagreements was the Putnam family. The young women of that family learned how to influence the men in their community. To have all those so called witches burned one can conclude that women were not as naïve and dumb as men of the time believed them to be. Although the social structure of seventeenth century allowed women limited opportunities for involvement in political affairs; the continued to work even if they could not keep the wages they

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