Confucianism Vs Legalism Analysis

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A Tale of Two Theories: Political Philosophy and Humanism Philosophy “Are not the Confucians rites and the Legalist laws one and the same notion? One could think so, as these rites and laws have the same goal: to regulate the behavior of each individual so as to establish a social order.” China’s modern day success story can be traced back to 6th century B.C.E, when two of the most significant political philosophies began to shape the culture: Confucianism and Legalism. The two philosophical theories, equally impacted Chinese civilization on a grand scale; signifying the establishment and the cessation of the first Chinese emperor’s dynasty, and the elongated success of another. Although the philosophies principles sought after a common objective, …show more content…
The Han Dynasty represents the first structured institution that successfully cultivated a political system to govern society through the correlation of a humanistic and administration methods created by two differing theories. Confucianism” and “Legalism” similar in their efforts both successfully influenced two dynasties through different means, thus stabilizing society for a time period. Although the overall similar intent to use methods for the improvement of society, the form of governing would determine the outcome of the two different theories. Legalism and Confucianism sought to excel through poised leadership, and influential efforts. Although, one may argue that Legalism, rather than Confucianism, rules over China today (Duan) The equation of the two theories has displayed an ability to produce a powerful, enduring rule over any society. This powerful correlation is largely responsible for the centralized, bureaucratic state, which plays such a central role in defining and reproducing Chinese society and culture over the centuries. In my view this combination is useful in the same way that Christianity and faith is useful to American politicians. As far as conflicting theories are concerned, it doesn 't matter whether one truly agrees or disagrees, what matters is that great leaders invoke the nation 's …show more content…
"Reviving the Past for the Future? : The (In)compatibility between Confucianism and Democracy in Contemporary China." Asian Philosophy Vol. 24.No. 2 (2014): 147–157. Article.
Fiero, Gloria K,. The Humanistic Tradition, Book 1:The First Civilizations and the Classical Legacy. Vol. 6th Edition. McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2011. Bookshelf Online.
HWANG, KWANG-KUO. "The Deep Structure of Confucianism: a social psychological approach." Asian Philosophy Vol. 11 (2001): pg. 180-200. Article.
Ma, Li. "A Comparison of the Legitimacy of Power Between Confucianist and Legalist Philosophies." Asian Philosophy Vol. 10 .Issue 1 (2000): p49-59. 11p.

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