Theme Of Hubris In Oedipus And Antigone

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Pride, an inward emotion, is often given a negative connotation. Synonymously used with hubris, excessive pride, the Greeks desired this quality. However, if the gods did not appreciate their hubristic attitude, they were severely punished. Sophocles replicates this quality in his plays Oedipus Rex and Antigone. The characters use their hubristic attitude unconsciously, hence, their actions result in negative consequences. Sophocles depicts hubris in Oedipus, Creon, and Antigone, which blinds them and consequently leads them to their fall.
Oedipus faces his inevitable downfall by constantly reaching immediate conclusions using his hubris. Oedipus claims to believe in Teiresias’s word, but he becomes hostile when he learns about his possible
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His pride is displayed as he demands to know everything simply because he wills it, regardless of the prophet’s decision to let events unfold themselves. Oedipus becomes aggravated by Teiresias’s visit and he responds harshly by accusing Creon. “‘Wealth, power, craft of statesmanship! Kingly position, everywhere admired! What savage envy is stored up against these…’” (Oedipus 20). By questioning Creon’s loyalty, Oedipus prides himself by wondering why his friend has foul envy towards him and his kingly possessions. Oedipus comes to the conclusion that Creon is scheming to destroy his stature and take his kingly rights. Along with this conviction towards Creon, Oedipus fails to recognize Teiresias’s hints regarding who the true murderer is. Teiresias hints towards Oedipus himself, however, Oedipus believes that he did not murder King Laios. His pride generates a boastful attitude, “‘…I wandered farther and farther on my way to a land where I should never see the evil sung by the oracle’” (Oedipus 41). This declaration of him outplaying the gods clearly displays the pride built …show more content…
Sophocles depicts these three as characters who use pride negatively for their wrongful actions. Their excessive pride influences the decisions they make, leading to their inevitable fall. As an excess of pride is reflected negatively in within these characters, people also who have this quality face an eventual downfall. Sophocles warns his readers that pride has a negative connotation, therefore, they should prevent their attitude to be influenced by their hubris. However, if one doe not cope with this hubristic attitude, they face a possible

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