The Science Delusion By Curtis White: Article Analysis

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In the third chapter of The Science Delusion, author Curtis White builds upon the importance of Romanticism as a counterculture for our science and logic based search for truth in our current society, as introduced in the second chapter. White enlightens his audience on what Romanticism can provide to our society as well as what science fails to provide for our humanity. His argument in remains mainly biological based but gives his audience a picture of how Romanticism has shaped human history. Throughout making his argument, White inherently gives his audience a look at his personal values and morals. Whether by design or by accident, the values White excerpts
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He downplays what science can provide to the people while promoting his cure-all, Romanticism. White claims to see where a culture blindly led by science will go and opens a door to tell his audience there is another way. In a way, it can be interpreted that White is writing this book for the greater good, for his fellow man to be enlightened like White was enlightened and drawn towards Romanticism after reading the works of Schilling, Schiller, and Morse. The purpose White shares with his audience has a small taste of selflessness to it. He makes it clear that with major figures in science such as James Watson and Francis Crick, “their ambition is only about their desire to join science’s ranks of Immortals like Newton and Einstein” (White,81). In a way, White is offering himself up as the enlightened man from Plato’s Allegory of the Cave. White has been enlightened by Romantics of the past wants others to see what he sees. Much like man from the allegory, White is returning to the cave to show the others that there is more to, in White’s argument, life and purpose that science leads us to believe. By returning to the cave, the man, and White, exhibit a great deal of selflessness. In this third chapter, White also compels other that have been enlightened to also return to the cave so that we leave no one in the darkness of the cave. This selflessness exhibited by White is difficult to find in today’s culture. White points out that science only finds truth to get recognition rather than the honest pursuit of Truth and a better life for all. Even our capitalistic economic system uses money and power for motivation instead of the altruistic values that could be in place with a more social and progressive system. White expresses many of the same values in the Progressive value system, working for improvement and societal progress. White’s apparent

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