Individuality In Brave New World Essay

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In “Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley, John “The Savage” is the character who fought the most for individuality. Because he grew up in a savage lifestyle, he is horrified by the inhumane society of the World State. After he realizes how disturbing the World State society actually is, he fights against it. John wants to live a real life, instead of one taken over by soma-dependent happiness. He voices his desire to Mustapha Mond when he says, “But I don’t want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin” (240). John thrives off his individuality and even lives in the wilderness on his own at the end of the novel. When the savage had a momentary lapse in judgment and gave into the World State by practicing in their rituals; therefore sacrificing his individuality, he was so disappointed and mad that he ended his own life.
Helmholtz Watson fights for individuality a lot as well and supports John in his protests against the World State toward the end of the book. Helmholtz is a very good, well-known writer and throughout the book, he thinks that he should use his writing to inspire people and for a better purpose. When confessing to Bernard,
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One such instance is when she decides to go to the savage reservation with Bernard. Lenina also travels out of the social norm, because she stays in a “relationship” with Henry Ford for four months. Lenina tells Fanny that she doesn’t see any problem with this when she says “No, there hasn’t been anyone else...And I jolly well don’t see why there should have been” (40). At the end of the novel, she goes back to John which exemplifies more of her individuality. She is lower on this list because she allows people like Fanny tell her what to do, and allows men treat her like

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