Essay On Women In Hamlet

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Women of high power, especially the queen, are often a role model for all women in the nation, especially the younger ones. She must live by a code different than most women; she has major expectations to uphold. She is seen as proper, pure, and powerful. She is expected to act like a lady and dress properly. She should be fashionable but her clothing should be modest and not show off too much skin, which is nearly contradictory today. Views on royal women can be very conflicting. She should not show off her body, but she is still expected to be a beautiful woman with some sex appeal. She is not to talk about sex or act in anyway lustful, as she is seen as too proper for such a dirty deed, yet she is expected to produce an heir for the throne. It is necessary to keep the throne in the family. In …show more content…
Upon deeper inspection we can see that these are empty accusations with no evidence to prove them. Their actions and dialogue oppose the men’s claims. Even when Gertrude was married to Old Hamlet, the relationship did not seem to be very sex based. Gertrude seems to value love and protection more than lust. Overall, Gertrude seems to be a good natured woman and does not think she has done anything she should feel guilty over until Hamlet tries to make her feel guilty. Ophelia is more of a submissive woman and will go along with anything that a male figure in her life tells her. She is sexually innocent and the only reason she has done anything sexual is due to Hamlet’s deceit. Hamlet criticizes Ophelia and constantly calls her a whore even though Hamlet is the one who corrupted her. Using the words and actions of Gertrude and Ophelia we can see that they are some of the most innocent characters in the play, yet they are portrayed, by the men, as the least innocent and most

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