Arguments Against Racial Segregation

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Despite the progress made in policy over time to implement desegregation, there are many institutions that remain separate among Blacks and Whites. The most daunting separation that occurs between the races is in the living space. Residential racial segregation is an anomaly, as all of the legal efforts to live together in harmony are thwarted by this major gap in integrated neighborhoods. Many factors are suspected to contribute to this continued trend. It is theorized that it is the choice of both races to stay separate, while it is observed that hidden discriminatory practices and public policy keep the two races apart. Both claims will provide a look at one of the forms of modern-day racial segregation in a supposed post-racial society. …show more content…
However, is it more one race’s choice than the other? Black people have always been advocates for the desegregation of American society, but it seems that this abstract principle does not fully match the kinds of neighborhoods that Blacks prefer to live in. For example, there has been expressed reluctance of Blacks to live in predominantly white neighborhoods. This is not due to the fear of Whites’ rejecting them, but the hostility and possible reactionary violence that could happen (Massey & Denton 88-90). Black people desire a 50-50 mixture when it comes to their neighborhood, true to desegregation, but White people have little tolerance for racial mixing beyond 20% of Black people (93). This is shown in the process of tipping. White residents who will tolerate a few Black people as neighbors, either willingly or unwillingly, begin to move out of the neighborhood when the number of Black people gets to be too high (Grodzins 34). This phenomenon supports the myth that Black people lower property values. So why does tipping occur? Stereotypes that Whites uphold about Blacks, deeming them unfit as neighbors play a huge role. Examples include Black people being lazy, prone to violence, unintelligent, moochers, more likely to be on welfare, and lacking a work ethic (95). The question of who has the predominant choice over where they can live and who they want in their neighborhood is shown every day in the covert practices that prevent minorities from moving into the suburbs, therefore keeping it homogenous-mostly White- and affluent (Seitles). It is difficult to ascertain what living situation Blacks would want, because it is impossible to say that forced segregation does not influence their decision making, therefore, there is no real choice available (Myrdal

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