The Pros And Cons Of Darwinism

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When Charles Darwin exposed his theory of evolution for the first time, criticism soon aroused. The period 's mindset highly motivated the struggles for acceptance of Darwin 's theory. In other words, by the 1800s, the notion of an old Earth filled with evolving species dating back from billions of years contradicted religious beliefs and was far beyond everything concluded by other scholars. Although his book soon attracted the attention and support of many scientists to his new “Darwinistic” set of beliefs, others did not sympathize with it. So Darwin had to face two biggest limitations: controversy probably generated as a result of religious concerns and on the other hand, the skepticism from fellow scholars. It was not until some years …show more content…
These assumptions were against religious principles and learning Darwin’s theory would require a long acceptance process from the public. On the other hand, what truly shocked the scientific community was the whole process of evolution entailed by “Darwinism”. They did agree with Darwin’s assumption that species evolved, but they refused to attribute the whole evolutionary process to natural and sexual selection alone. They might have thought there were still some weak points in his theory that made it incomplete, and that natural selection as it was, would not account for the animal diversity discovered in fossils …show more content…
They use physics’ knowledge to determine the geological age of rocks by the usage of isotopes. These isotopes are different forms of an element that differ in the number of protons and neutrons in their nucleus that makes them different elements with different half-life. It is important to note that a “half-life” is the period when the isotope decay to its half value. An isotope of carbon can be Carbon-12, Carbon-13, and Carbon-14, similar variations happen to many other elements. In fact, there is an enormous selection of isotopes that scientists use today, and they all provide substantial evidence of the age of rocks depending on their half-life. For example, if we know a rock is considerably old we can use Rubidium-87 since its half-life is suitable to test very long periods of time. Then, scientists use the ratio of Rubidium-87 along with its decay product (called Strontium-87) and plot the slope. This ration of decay is an accurate explanation of the age of rocks that could have been difficult to interpret without the appropriate knowledge in fields like Physics and

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