Analysis Of The Politics Of Buddhist Revival By Laurence Cox

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The Politics of Buddhist Revival Laurence Cox wrote an article that explores several aspects of U’ Dhammaloka’s Buddhism, and who he was as a Buddhist (Cox, 2010). Laurence Cox explores U’ Dhammaloka’s involvement in the Buddhist Tract Society (BTS), as a social movement organizer, and his participation in politics. (Cox, 2010). Also, the sacred Buddhist text that Dhammaloka could not interpret during his preaching tours.
Summary
Cox, (2010), in his article “The Politics of Buddhist Revival: U’ Dhammaloka’s as Social Movement Organizer,” explains who U’ Dhammaloka was as a Buddhist (Cox, 2010). U’ Dhammaloka was born Irish turned Buddhist Monk, he was fiery-tempered, quick-witted, and charming as well as sociable (Cox, 2010, p. 174)).
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As well as his method of reaching the Buddhist society, by utilizing the newspaper, going on preaching tours, his work in the media, his hot temper, and a movement organizer to spread his teachings on Buddhism. Dhammaloka’s Buddhist mission that he founded in April 1904 where he fed three thousand disadvantaged individuals was an act of kindness, even though some felt that he was hostile. I believe the decisions Dhammaloka made to open a free English-Language school in Siam, and donations he received from Burmese merchants in Bangkok for a school he established in a working –class district, was another impressive strategy he used to spread his message of Buddhism (Cox, 2010, p. 183). However, I felt that Dhammaloka not being able to identify with the sacred scriptures of Pali and Burmese, raised some concerns in my mind, being that he was a well-known …show more content…
The unit mentioned that Buddha also appealed to a group of disciples, he guided to a various direction to teach about the Dharma (Fisher, 2014, p. 150). According to Fisher, two hundred years after the death of Buddha, a great Indian King name Ashoka led a vast military movement to spread his message regarding Buddhism (Fisher, 2014, p. 150). Unlike Dhammaloka, Ashoka engraved various teachings upon rocks, and pillars concerning his teachings on Buddhism. Monks in vast locations also distributed Ashoka teaching. Ashoka teachings on Buddhism circulated through the kingdom and outward to several countries and became a global religion (Fisher, 2014, p. 150). Dhammaloka teaching traveled throughout the land by way of the newspaper, and the BTS (Cox, 2010, p. 174).
After the death of Ashoka, philosophy and culture were developed, Buddhist colleges were built, and various school of interpretation was developed in Theravada and Mahayana (Fisher, 2014, p. 151). I think it was a well thought out decision on Ashoka as well as U’ Dhammaloka to open up a variety of schools all over the country so that their sacred teachings would

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