Frederick Douglass 'The Columbian Orator': An Analysis

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The slave system dehumanized slaves, made them have no self-consciousness of human being. He pointed out slaves did not enjoy much privilege. They do the labor work all season, but received limited supplies and necessities; they lived under an extreme poor condition place, each covered a miserable blankets and sleep on the cold, dump flood in all season (Douglass, Chp 2). They were afraid of telling the truth about their masters. In south slaveholders’ mind, slaves were product and tool of laboring for support slaveholders’ living. Masters only care about keep slaves working for them as long as slave can alive and how much fortune and wealth slaves can bring to them. Meanwhile, masters enjoyed whipping and mistreating slaves. When Douglass …show more content…
The book “The Columbian Orator” brought him attention to understand the rights of human being and help him to acknowledge the inequalities of being a slave (chp 7). Knowledge helped him recognize himself as men instead of as a slave and articulate the injustice of slavery, but he was unable to find a way escaping from slavery. When he was working in Covery’s plantation, he lost his hope and desire to learn and escape under covery’s brutal treatment. Douglass’s successfully fought back to Covery’s brutal beatings, and terrified his master which set as the climax of the story. This showed an action of fighting what people believed is injustice is more important and effective than the people who had knowledge but afraid to speak out the injustice of slavery. This also showed Douglass as slave his awareness of manhood, which help he’s able to reclaim his strong desire to learn and break the slavery. After that, he learned he took up the responsibility of encourage free slaves learn to read and write and escape. He eventually escaped to northern by the support of other slaves. Although Douglass had a clear understanding that the path to freedom was not easy, his fully awaked self- consciousness from the experience as slave, have the clear purpose in his action and the increase of knowledge about abolitionism guide to the path of expressing his voice of freedom. His voice of abolitionism according to his knowledge and own experience of slavery caught the attention, received help and support of white abolitionists, such as David Ruggles, Joseph Ricketson, and so on (Chp

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