The Influence Of The First Arab-Israeli War

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Register to read the introduction… 29, 1947, to partition Palestine, then still under British mandate, into an Arab state and a Jewish state.” Though initially Arab guerilla forces, commanded by British officers were succeeding in capturing a number of settlements, including that of Jerusalem, by April the tide had turned and the Haganah seized the offensive and were recapturing areas. The day after the declaration of Israeli independence heavily supplied military forces from Transjordan, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia arrived to support the efforts of the Arab Palestinian forces.
Foreign involvement was most certainly a highly important factor in the initiation of the first Arab-Israeli war. The UN, US, and British all had they are separate causes for involving themselves in the situation at hand in Palestine. The UN for peacekeeping purposes, the US and other countries because of the guilt of not having granted European Jews asylum from Hitler during World War II, and the British because they were given Palestine as a mandate following the first World War. Having initially supported the Jewish Zionist movement as seen in
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Though in the region of 1% of Israel’s total population died (roughly 6,000), and 7,000 of the troops of the Arab nations, the victor was still Israel; it had taken more land than was proposed to be given to them, it’s own religious based legal country, and had survived attack at it’s birth. Involvement of international countries, well planned out command, large and successful military, incentive to succeed and bad planning on behalf of the Arab League led Israel to win the war in 1947-49 (1948). “The end result of the 1948-49 Israeli War of Independence was the creation of a Jewish State slightly larger than that which was proposed by the 1947 United Nations Resolution

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